TwitterFacebookpinterest




The author of this page will appreciate comments, corrections and imagery related to the subject. Please contact Anatoly Zak.

 

Progress MS-12 arrives at ISS

Russian specialists at Baikonur Cosmodrome launched a Soyuz-2-1a rocket on July 31, 2019, carrying the Progress MS-12 cargo ship on its way to the International Space Station, ISS. Upon reaching orbit in less than 10 minutes, the spacecraft began a two-orbit rendezvous process with the station, which resulted in docking with the Russian Segment in a record-breaking time for the ISS program of 3 hours and 19 minutes.


Previous mission: Progress MS-11

Bookmark and Share

launch

Progress MS-12 mission at a glance:

Spacecraft designation(s) Progress MS-12 (No. 442) ISS mission 73P
Launch vehicle Soyuz-2-1a
Launch site Baikonur, Site 31, Pad 6
Mission Cargo delivery to the ISS
Spacecraft mass at orbit insertion 7,392 kilograms
Launch date and time 2019 July 31, 15:10:46.153 Moscow Time
Docking date and time 2019 July 31, 18:29 Moscow Time - actual (18:35 – planned)
Destination Russian Segment, Pirs Docking Compartment, SO1
From the publisher: Pace of our development depends primarily on the level of support from our readers!
Donate

Progress MS-12 mission

According to Roskosmos, the Progress MS-12 cargo ship was slated to deliver 1.2 tons of dry cargo, more than a ton of propellant in the tanks of its refueling section, 420 kilograms of water inside the Rodnik tank system and 50 kilograms of gas in pressurized bottles. Roskosmos reported the total mass of payload aboard Progress MS-12 to be approximately 2,670 kilograms.

As of 2014, the launch of Progress MS-12 was planned for July 1, 2018. The mission was later re-scheduled for June 5, 2019, and July 31, 2019, at 15:13 Moscow Time. The liftoff had been initially set for the two-day rendezvous profile with the station, but the launch time was later shifted to 15:10 Moscow Time to enable a two-orbit (three-hour) flight to the station, concluding with the docking at around 18:35 Moscow Time on the same day.

Summary of cargo aboard Progress MS-12, according to the Russian mission control:

Dry cargo delivered in the cargo compartment
1,164 kilograms
Water in the tanks of the Rodnik system
420 kilograms
Oxygen in the gas bottles
51 kilograms
Propellant in the refueling section
850 kilograms
Propellant in the integrated propulsion system
880 kilograms
Total spacecraft mass at orbital insertion
7,392 kilograms

 

Breakdown of dry cargo aboard Progress MS-12, according to the Russian mission control:

Hardware for onboard systems
394 kilograms
Medical supplies
27 kilograms
Personal protective gear
1 kilogram
Hygiene items
190 kilograms
Repairs and servicing equipment
7 kilograms
Means of crew support
20 kilograms
Food
282 kilograms
Payloads
13 kilograms
Structural components and other hardware
38 kilograms
NASA cargo
192 kilograms

Launch campaign

pad

On July 1, 2019, specialists at the spacecraft processing building at Site 254 in Baikonur completed vacuum testing of the spacecraft and on July 8, they performed the final test of the ship's solar panels with their exposure to an array of electric lights. The fueling of the spacecraft was finished by July 19, when the vehicle was returned to the processing building at Site 254 for final operations.

The loading of the ship's cargo was completed on July 22 and the next day, Progress MS-12 was attached to its launch vehicle adapter serving as an interface with its Soyuz-2-1a rocket. The final inspection of the ship and its subsequent encapsulation inside the payload fairing was performed on July 24.

The next day, the payload section was transferred from the spacecraft assembly building at Site 254 to the launch vehicle assembly building at Site 31 for integration with the rocket. On July 26, the payload was connected to the third stage of the launch vehicle and then the resulting upper composite was integrated with the first and second stages of the Soyuz-2-1a rocket on the transporter/erector. On the same day, the technical management and members of the State Commission gave green light to the rollout of the vehicle to the launch pad at Site 31.

Progress MS-12 mission profile

launch

A Soyuz-2-1a rocket rocket carrying the Progress MS-12 cargo ship lifted off from Site 31 in Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS, on July 31, 2019, at 15:10:46.153 Moscow Time (8:10 a.m. EDT).

The separation of the Progress MS-12 spacecraft from the third stage of the launch vehicle toom place at 15:19:35 Moscow Time (8:19 a.m. EDT). Roskosmos did not disclose the planned parameters of the initial orbit, but reported that the spacecraft woould be released into an orbit with an average altitude of 210 kilometers. According to NASA, at the moment of cargo ship's liftoff, the ISS was overflying Southern Kazakhstan at an altitude of 261 statute miles. The station had reached a border between Northern Mongolia and Southern Russia by the time, when the Progress MS-12 entered orbit, NASA said.

According to the Russian mission control, Progress MS-12 entered an initial orbit with the following parameters:

Minimal distance from the Earth's surface (perigee) 192.9 kilometers
Maximum distance from the Earth's surface (apogee) 241.1 kilograms
Orbital period 88.55 minutes
Orbital inclination 51.67 degrees

As originally planned, Progress MS-12 performed a two-orbit rendezvous with the station, aiming to dock at the nadir- (downward) pointing port of the Pirs Docking Compartment, SO1, a part of the Russian Segment of the ISS, 3 hours 25 minutes after liftoff, at 18:35 Moscow Time (11:35 a.m. EDT) on the day of the launch. That docking port was vacated by the Progress MS-11 cargo ship on July 29, 2019.

As usual, the rendezvous and docking operations were planned in a fully automated mode, the Russian mission control confirmed.

According to NASA, on July 29, cosmonauts Alexey Ovchinin and Alexander Skvortsov practiced working with the tele-robotically operated rendezvous unit, TORU, for the upcoming arrival of Progress MS-12. As in many previous Progress missions, the two cosmonauts will be at the TORU console inside the Zvezda Service Module, SM, ready to activate manual controls in the unlikely event of problems with the automated rendezvous system.

NASA also said that Progress MS-12 performed six impulse burns in the rendezvous process with the station.

The following autonomous rendezvous process was planned according to the following timeline:

Start of the autonomous rendezvous 16:15:04 Moscow Time
Activation of the rendezvous equipment on the Zvezda Service Module 17:03:32 Moscow Time
Activation of the rendezvous equipment on the cargo ship 17:04:32 Moscow Time
Flyaround and station-keeping period starts 18:14 Moscow Time
Flyaround and station-keeping period ends 18:25 Moscow Time
Final approach and berthing starts 18:25 Moscow Time
Contact 18:35:11 Moscow Time
Docking process begins 18:35 Moscow Time
Docking process ends 18:52 Moscow Time

The actual docking was completed at 18:29:17 Moscow Time, setting a new record for reaching the ISS at 3 hours 18 minutes and 31 seconds.

According to the Russian mission control, the docking process had the following timeline:

Contact and capture 18:29:17 Moscow Time
Movement of the docking port probe (373.053 millimeters) 18:34:27 Moscow Time
Electric connector No. 1 docking 18:32:41 Moscow Time
Electric connector No. 2 docking 18:32:41 Moscow Time
Electric connector No. 3 docking 18:32:41 Moscow Time
Electric connector No. 4 docking 18:32:41 Moscow Time
Interface closure 18:32:44 Moscow Time
Pressing of the interface seal 18:33:39 Moscow Time
Closure of the hooks 18:34:12 Moscow Time

 

insider content

 

 

Bookmark and Share


This page is maintained by Anatoly Zak; Last update: July 31, 2019

Page editor: Alain Chabot; Last edit: July 29, 2019

All rights reserved

insider content

 

adapter

Progress MS-12 is being prepared for integration with the launch vehicle adapter on July 23, 2019. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


fairing

Progress MS-12 rolls inside its payload fairing on July 24, 2019. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


kozlov

The payload fairing used during the mission was emblazoned with the portrait of Dmitry Kozlov, the first head of what is known today as RKTs Progress, the manufacturer of the Soyuz rockets and several generations of military and civilian remote-sensing satellites. Kozlov, who died in 2009, would turn 100 in 2019. Click to enlarge. Credit: RKK Energia


mik

Payload section with the Progress MS-12 spacecraft is being prepared for transportation to the launch vehicle assembly building on July 25, 2019. Click to enlarge. Credit: RKK Energia


workers

Fueling specialists working below the Soyuz-2-1a rocket with the Progress MS-12 spacecraft. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


ignition

Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos

launch

Progress MS-12 lifts off on July 31, 2019. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos