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Kurs-NA

Kurs-NA rendezvous system


sep

Soyuz MS power supply system


EKTS

EKTS communications system


kdu

Propulsion system


SZI-M

"Black Box"


 

Soyuz MS-13 mission

The three new crew members of Expeditions 60 and 61 to the International Space Station, ISS, blasted off from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on July 20, 2019 aboard the Soyuz MS-13 spacecraft. In less than nine minutes after liftoff, the Soyuz-FG launch vehicle successfully released the crew vehicle into orbit.


Previous mission: Soyuz MS-12

launch

Soyuz MS-13 mission at a glance:

Crew at launch Aleksandr Skvortsov, Luca Parmitano, Andrew Morgan (up only)
Crew at landing Aleksandr Skvortsov, Luca Parmitano, Christina Koch (down only)
Spacecraft designation Soyuz MS-13, 11F732 Production No. 746, ISS mission 59S
Launch vehicle Soyuz-FG No. U 15000-069
Launch Site Baikonur, Site 1, Pad No. 5
Launch date 2019 July 20, 19:28:20.238 Moscow Time (actual); 19:28:21 (planned)
Docking date and time 2019 July 21, 01:47:52 (actual); 01:50 Moscow Time (planned)
Docking destination ISS, Russian Segment, Zvezda Service Module, SM, aft port
Flight duration Soyuz MS-13, Skvortsov, Parmitano: 201 days; Morgan: 256 days
Landing 2020 Feb. 6 for Soyuz MS-13; (Morgan: 2020 April 1 aboard Soyuz MS-15)
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Preparations for flight

During various incarnations of the ISS flight manifest, the launch of Soyuz MS-13 spacecraft mission was scheduled on July 10, July 24 and July 6, 2019. As of the beginning of 2019, the spacecraft was scheduled to remain in orbit for 215 days and return to Earth on Feb. 6, 2020, however by the beginning of February 2019, the landing was advanced to December 18 of the same year. Then, at the beginning of April 2019, Roskosmos decided to postpone the launch of Soyuz MS-13 from July 6 to July 20. The latest schedule changes were reportedly related to delays with the introduction of NASA's crew vehicles at the end of 2019.

The active preparations for the mission began on May 14, when the spacecraft was transported into the vacuum chamber at Site 254 in Baikonur for tests using a mixture of helium and air to ensure the absence of leaks in the ship's pressurized compartments. On July 1, the solar panels of the spacecraft were exposed to an array of electric lights testing their ability to supply power.

On July 4, the primary and backup crews preparing for the Soyuz MS-13 mission traveled to Baikonur Cosmodrome for final training. The primary crew included the Russian cosmonaut Aleksandr Skvortsov, European astronaut Luca Parmitano and NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan. The backup crew was comprised of Sergei Ryzhikov (Roskosmos), Tom Marshburn (ESA) and Soichi Noguchi (Japan). A day after arriving at Baikonur, both teams worked inside the flight-worthy Soyuz MS-13 undergoing final preparations at the spacecraft processing building at Site 254. The cosmonauts and astronauts also tried on their Sokol spacesuits and checked them for air leaks. After completion of the familiarization training, Soyuz MS-13 was sent to fueling, which was completed on July 8 and, on the same day, the spacecraft was returned to Site 254 for final checks.

On July 10, Soyuz MS-13 was integrated with its launch vehicle adapter, and on July 12, it underwent its final visual inspection and on the same day, the ship was rolled inside its payload fairing.

On July 16, the payload section with the spacecraft was transported to the vehicle assembly building at Site 112 and the next day, it was integrated with the Emergency Escape System, SAS, and the third stage of the Soyuz launch vehicle. The resulting upper composite was then transferred to the transporter/erector, where it was connected to the lower booster stages of the Soyuz rocket. Before the end of the day, the technical management and the State Commission gave the green light to the rollout of the vehicle to the launch pad at Site 1 next morning.

rollout

Soyuz MS-13 launch profile

A Soyuz-FG rocket carrying the Soyuz MS-13 (No. 746) transport spacecraft lifted off from Site 1 in Baikonur on July 20, 2019, at 19:28:20.238 Moscow Time (12:28 p.m. EDT, 16:28 UTC). The spacecraft carried Russian cosmonaut Aleksandr Skvortsov, European astronaut Luca Parmitano and NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan to the International Space Station, ISS. Aboard the station, the trio will be a part of Expeditions 60 and 61.

The launch vehicle followed a standard ascent profile inserting the spacecraft into an initial parking orbit with an inclination of 51.6 degrees toward the Equator exacty 8 minutes and 48 seconds after liftoff. The spacecraft separated from the third stage of the launch vehicle at 19:37 Moscow Time.

launch

According to the Russian mission control in Korolev and Roskosmos, Soyuz MS-13 entered an initial orbit with the following parameters:

Parameter
TsNIIMash (Mission control) (actual data?)
Roskosmos (projected numbers?)
Perigee
198.8 kilometers
198.1 kilometers
Apogee
228.5 kilometers
267.1 kilometers*
Orbital period
88.50 minutes
88.85 minutes
Orbital inclination
51.63 degrees toward the Equator
51.65 degrees toward the Equator

*The projected apogee was actually 242 kilometers (plus/minus 42 kilometers)

Rendezvous and docking

approach

Following a six-and-a-half-hour, four-orbit rendezvous profile, Soyuz MS-13 was scheduled to dock at the aft port of the Zvezda Service Module, SM, a part of the Russian Segment of the ISS at 6:51 p.m. EDT (July 21, 01:51 Moscow Time). According to the Russian mission control, the actual docking took place at 01:47:52 Moscow Time on July 21 (6:48 p.m. EDT on July 20, according to NASA).

According to Russian mission control, the post-docking activities had the following timeline:

  • 01:48 - 02:35 Moscow Time: Closing of hooks on the docking port; Checks of hard mate and pressurization in the modules of the spacecraft; transfer into the Habitation Module;
  • 02:35 - 03:50 Moscow Time: The removal and drying of pressure safety suits; checks of pressurization in the docking port;
  • 03:50 - 04:20 Moscow Time: Equalization of pressure between the station and the transport spacecraft; Opening of the hatches; TV broadcast about the arrival at the station.

The hatches between the spacecraft and the station were scheduled to open around two hours after docking around 03:50 Moscow Time on July 21 (8:50 p.m. EDT on July 20). In reality, they were opened nearly 15 minutes late, after some push on the Soyuz' hatch by Oleg Ovchinin from the station's side.

Aboard the ISS, the Soyuz MS-13 crew will join three members of the Soyuz MS-12 crew.

Soyuz MS-13 re-docks to make way for Soyuz MS-14

Soyuz MS-13 begins a fly-around of the ISS, shortly after undocking from the aft port on the Zvezda Service Module.


Late afternoon after the aborted docking of the Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft on August 24, 2019, ISS program managers approved a plan to undock the Soyuz MS-13 spacecraft from the Zvezda Service Module, SM, at 06:34 Moscow Time and re-dock it at the MIM2-Poisk module at 06:59 Moscow Time on August 26 (11:59 p.m. EDT on August 25). Roskosmos announced the decision on the morning of August 25.

Because the re-docking operation could be conducted under manual control, Soyuz MS-13 did not need the Kurs-P rendezvous system aboard the MIM2 Poisk module which was suspected to be the culprit in the docking failure between the station and the Soyuz MS-14. At the same time, the move would free the aft port on the Zvezda with a well-functioning Kurs-P system for a second automated docking attempt by the Soyuz MS-14. It was to be the first re-docking of the Soyuz since August 2015, when Soyuz TMA-16M had to move from MIM2 Poisk to Zvezda.

During the redocking operation, Soyuz MS-13 crew was instructed to back away to a distance of around 38 meters from the aft port of the service module and after a short station-keeping period to fly around and align the transport ship with the MIM2 Poisk module. After another station-keeping period, the spacecraft would be ready to dock at the Poisk.

In preparation for re-docking, the ISS crew began activation of systems aboard Soyuz MS-13 on August 25. Several hours before the move, three crew members took their usual seats inside the Descent Module. The Soyuz commander Aleksandr Skvortsov was at the controls of spacecraft in the center seat, with Luca Parmitano to his left and Andrew Morgan in the right seat.

Nearly as planned, the transport ship undocked from ISS at 06:35:26 Moscow Time and backed away from the ISS. The crew reported a distance of between 31 and 32 meters from the station, as the Soyuz began a slow roll maneuver followed by a fly-around of the station. After aligning the transport ship with the zenith (space-facing) docking port on the MIM2 Poisk module, Skvortsov initiated the final approach which was briefly interrupted by a short station-keeping period at a distance of five or six meters from the station. As the Soyuz reached its new destination, an operator at mission control in Korolev was heard reporting the time of contact between the two spacecraft as 06:59:37 Moscow Time on August 26, 2019, (11:59 p.m. EDT on August 25).

It was the 47th re-docking for the Soyuz spacecraft family and the 18th such operation in the course of the ISS flight history.

According to NASA, at the time of docking, the vehicles were flying east of Beijing, China. Around the same time, the Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft was orbiting the Earth some 165 miles behind the ISS and was conducting its own maneuvers, in preparation for a second docking attempt with the station the next day, NASA said.

Soyuz MS-13 re-docks at the MIM2 Poisk module on August 26, 2019.


Soyuz MS-13 crews:

Primary crew
Backup crew
Aleksandr Skvortsov (Roskosmos) Commander, Flight Engineer of Expedition 60/61
Sergei Ryzhikov (Roskosmos) Commander Soyuz MS-13, Flight engineer ISS;
Luca Parmitano (ESA) Flight engineer 1 Soyuz MS-13, Flight Engineer Expedition 60, Commander Expedition 61
Tom Marshburn (NASA) Flight engineer 1 Soyuz MS-13, ISS
Andrew Morgan (NASA) Flight engineer 2 Soyuz MS-13, Flight engineer Expedition 60/61
Soichi Noguchi (Japan) Flight engineer Soyuz MS-13, ISS

Next mission: Soyuz MS-14

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This page is maintained by Anatoly Zak; Last update: September 25, 2019

Page editor: Alain Chabot; Last edit: July 26, 2019

All rights reserved

 

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vacuum

Soyuz MS-13 is being transported into vacuum chamber on May 14, 2019. Click to enlarge. Credit: RKK Energia


crew

Crew of Soyuz MS-13 during familiarization training in Baikonur on July 16, 2019. Click to enlarge. Credit: RKK Energia


fairing

Soyuz MS-13 is being prepared for integration with the payload fairing. Click to enlarge. Credit: RKK Energia


liftoff

Soyuz MS-13 lifts off from Baikonur on July 20, 2019. Click to enlarge. Credit: RKK Energia


stage2

stage2

stage3

stage3

stage3

sb

An external camera aboard Soyuz MS-13 tansmitted live images of the second and third stage separation and solar panels deployment during the launch on July 20, 2019. Credit: NASA TV


approach

Soyuz MS-13 approaches ISS on July 20, 2019. Credit: NASA