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Venera-D in 2021


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Russian space program in 2021

On February 20, Head of Roskosmos Dmitry Rogozin paid a visit to the Kremlin for a report to the president on the year-end status of the Russian space sector. In a public transcript of his exchange with Vladimir Putin, Rogozin said that 29 space launches had been planned for 2021, including missions postponed from the previous year, referring primarily to the OneWeb Internet satellites, but also to the long-delayed launch of the Luna-25 lander and the Obzor-R radar-carrying satellite. Two modules for the Russian Segment of the International Space Station, ISS, (Nauka and Prichal) were also promised to fly. Finally, one Angara-5 and two Angara-1.2 launchers were scheduled to continue flight testing of the new rocket family. According to Rogozin, the Russian civilian satellite constellation included 89 spacecraft at the time.

For missions in 2020 click here

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A Soyuz-2-1b rocket lifts off on February 2, 2021.

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The world's orbital launch attempts in 2021 (as of April 13, 2021 ):

-
Country
Launch date
Time of launch
Payload
Payload type
Launch vehicle
Launch site
Launch complex
Launch pad
Status
1
USA
Jan. 7
9:15 p.m. EST
Turksat-5A
Application / communications
Falcon-9 (104, B1060.4)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
2
USA
Jan. 17
10:38 a.m. PST
10 ELaNa CubeSats: CACTUS-1, ExoCube-12, MiTEE, CoSGC, PolarCube, Cu-PACE, TechEdSat-7, CAPE-3, RadExSat-2, PICS-1, -2
Experimental
LauncherOne Rocket 3/Boeing-747 Cosmic Girl
Mojave
-
-
Success
3
China
Jan. 20
00:25 Beijing Time
Tiangong-1-03
Application / communications
Chang Zheng-3/G2
Xichang
2
-
Success
4
USA
Jan. 20
07:26 UTC
GMS-T
-
Electron
Mahia
LC1
-
Success
5
USA
Jan. 20
8:02 a.m. EST
Starlink Flight 17 (956-1,014) (60)
Application / communications
Falcon-9-105 (B1051.8 S)
Cape Canaveral (KSC)
39A
A
Success
6
USA
Jan. 24
10:00 a.m. EST
Transporter-1: Starlink (x10), ASELSAT, Capella-3 (Whitney-1), Capella-4 (Whitney-2), Charlie, PIXL-1 (CubeL, OSIRIS4Cubesat), Flock-4s (x40), GHGSat-C2 (Hugo), ICEYE-X8, -X9, -X10, IDEASSat, ION-SVC 2 (ION-SVC Laurentius, PULSE) [Flock-4s (x8), SpaceBEE (x12)], Kepler (x8), Landmapper-Demo-6, -7, Lemur-2 (x8), Prometheus-2.10 (P2-10), ELaNa-35: PTD-1, QPS-SAR-2 Izanami (IQPS-2), ADELIS-SAMSON-1, -2, -3, SOMP-2b, SpaceBEE (x24), SXRS-3 / Sherpa-FX 1 [ARCE-1A, ARCE-1B, ARCE-1C, Astrocast (x5), Hawk-2A, -2B, -2C, hosted payloads: Celestis-17, ELROI, EyeStar-Tag], UVSQ-SAT, V-R3X (x3), XR-1, YUSAT
Application
Falcon-9 (106-B1063.2S)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
7
China
Jan. 29
12:47 Beijing Time
Yaogan Weixing-31 Group-2
Military
Chang Zheng-4C (Y31)
Jiuquan
43/94
-
Success
8
China
Feb. 1
16:15 Beijing Time
Fangzhou-2
Experimental
Shuang Quxian-1 (Y2)
Jiuquan
43/95
-
Failure
9
Russia
Feb. 2
23:45:28.079 Moscow Time
Military / electronic intelligence
4
Success
10
USA
Feb. 4
1:19 a.m. EST
Starlink Flight 18 (60 sats: 1,014-1,074)
Application / communications
Falcon-9-107 v1.2 (Block 5)
Cape Canaveral
LC-40
-
Success
11
China
Feb. 4
23:36:04.286 Beijing Time
TJSW-6
Military
Chang Zheng-3B/G3 Y77
Xichang
3
-
Success
12
Russia
Feb. 15
07:45:06.310 Moscow Time
Piloted / cargo supply
6
Success
13
USA
Feb. 15
10:59 p.m. EST
Starlink Flight 19 (60 satellites)
Application / communications
Falcon-9 v1.2 Block 5, Flight 108 (B1059.6 S)
Cape Canaveral
LC-40
-
Success
14
USA
Feb. 20
12:36:54.4 p.m. EST
Cygnus NG-15 (CRS-15, S.S. Kathrine Johnson), ThinSat 2 (x30), DhabiSat (MYSat-2), Gunsmoke-J-2 (Jacob's Ladder-2), IT-Spins, Classified U.S. government payload (x2)
Piloted / cargo supply
Wallops Isl.
-
-
Success
15
China
Feb. 21
10:22 Beijing Time
Yaogan Weixing-31 Group-3 (x3)
Military
Chang Zheng-4C
Jiuquan
-
-
Success
16
India
Feb. 28
10:24 a.m. India Standard Time
Amazonia-1, SindhuNetra, SDSat, NanoConnect-2, UNITYsat-1 - 3, SpaceBEE-76 - 87
Application / remote sensing
PSLV-C51
Sriharikota
-
-
Success
17
Russia
Feb. 28
09:55:01.415 Moscow Time
Application / weather forecasting
6
Success
18
USA
March 4
03:24:54 a.m. EST
Starlink Flight 20 (60 sats)
Application / communications
Falcon-9 (B1049.8)
Cape Canaveral, KSC
39A
A
Success
19
USA
March 11
03:13:29 a.m. EST
Starlink Flight 21 (60 sats)
Application / communications
Falcon-9-110 (B1058.6 S)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
20
China
March 12
01:51 Beijing Time
Shiyan-9
Experimental
Chang Zheng-7A (Y2)
Wenchang
-
-
Success
21
China
March 13
10:19 Beijing Time
Yaogan Weixing-31 Group-4 (x3)
Military
Chang Zheng-4C (Y42)
Jiuquan
43/94
-
Success
22
USA
March 14
6:01 a.m. EDT
Starlink Flight 22 (v1.0 L21) (60 sats)
Application / communications
Falcon-9 (111 - B1051.9 S)
Cape Canaveral, KSC
39A
A
Success
23
Russia
March 22
09:07:12.770 Moscow Time
Application / remote sensing
6
Success
24
USA
March 23
11:30 New Zealand Decree Time
BlackSky-7, Centauri-3, Gunsmoke-J-1 (Jacob's Ladder-1), M2-A, M2-B, Myriota-7, Veery RL1-v0.1
Various
Electron/Photon
Mahia
LC-1A
A
Success
25
USA
March 24
4:28 a.m. EDT
Starlink Flight 23 (60 satellites)
Application / communications
Falcon-9
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
26
Russia
March 25
05:47:33.180 Moscow Time
Application / communications
-
Success
27
China
March 31
06:45 Beijing Time
Gaofen-12 02
Application / remote-sensing
Chang Zheng-4C (Y43)
Jiuquan
-
-
Success
28
USA
April 7
12:34 p.m. EDT
Starlink (60 satellites)
Application / communications
Falcon-9
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
29
China
April 9
07:01 Beijing Time
Shiyan-6-3
Experimental
Chang Zheng-4B (Y49)
Taiyuan
9
-
Success
30
Russia
April 9
10:42:40.496 Moscow Time
6
Success

 

 

The 2021 space launch score card (as of April 13, 2021 ):

USA
China
Russia
India
World
Launch vehicles
Falcon-9:
10
Chang Zheng-3B:
2
PSLV:
1
LauncherOne:
1
Chang Zheng-4C:
4
Electron:
2
Shuang Quxian-1:
1*
Antares:
1
Chang Zheng-7A:
1
 
-
Chang Zheng-48:
1
 
USA total:
14
China total:
9
Russia total:
6
India total:
1
World total:
30
USA failed:
0
China failed:
1
Russia failed:
0
India failed:
0
World failed:
1
Launch sites
Cape Canaveral:
10
Xichang:
2
Sriharikota:
1
World
launch sites:
12
Mojave:
1
Jiuquan:
5

Baikonur:
4

 
Mahia:
2
Wenchang:
1
 
Wallops Island:
1
Taiyuan:
1
     

*Failed launch

 

 

Planned Russian orbital launches in 2021:

April 26, 01:14 Moscow Time: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat rocket to launch the sixth cluster of OneWeb satellites from the Soyuz launch facility in Vostochny. (As of March 25, 2021)

On March 29, 2021, a booster cluster consisting of the four modules of the first stage and the core module of the second stage was moved from a storage position to a worksite for processing and testing inside the launch vehicle processing building in Vostochny. In parallel, the specialists began working with the segments of the payload fairing for the same vehicle, Roskosmos said on March 30. According to the State Corporation, the Fregat stage for the mission was undergoing fueling at the fueling station scheduled to continue until April 11, 2021.

The transport aircraft carrying 36 satellites for the mission departed Florida on April 3, 2021, and, after landing at the Ignatievo airfield near Blagoveshensk and ground transportation to Vostochny, their processing officially started on April 6, 2021.

The launch would increase the number of satellites in the OneWeb constellation from 146 to 182.

reload

Booster stages of the Soyuz rocket for the sixth OneWeb mission are being transferred to a test worksite on March 29, 2021.


May 27: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat rocket to launch the seventh OneWeb mission (carrying 36 satellites) from the Soyuz launch facility in Vostochny. (As of April 2021)


June 30: A Soyuz-2-1a rocket to launch the Progress MS-17 cargo ship (Production No. 446, ISS mission 78P) from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS.

During the early planning of the ISS flight manifest in 2014, the first Russian cargo mission of 2021 was planned for February 22, however by August 2020, the launch of Progress MS-17 was projected on March 19, 2021. By November 2020, the start of the mission slipped to June 30.

Roskosmos announced the arrival of the spacecraft at Baikonur on March 11, 2020.

According to the August 2020 plan, Progress MS-17 was to initially dock to the aft port of the Zvezda Service Module, SM. However, in case of a successful arrival of the MLM Nauka module at the station in April 2021, Progress MS-17 would be re-docked to the nadir (Earth-facing) port of the newly arrived component at the end of July 2021. The move will allow Roskosmos to prepare the next step in the expansion of the Russian Segment, this time with the UM Prichal node module. Upon the launch of Prichal, then scheduled for September 6, 2021, the Progress MS-17 will be undocked from Nauka's nadir port, carrying with it a special extension on Nauka's docking mechanism, which was custom-designed for cargo ships and crew vehicles. As a result, the Prichal module will then be able to dock to the reconfigured port on Nauka on September 8, 2021, forming a wider passageway than was available through the adapter, which had been discarded with Progress MS-17.

If everything goes according to the August 2020 plan, Progress MS-17 will log 179 days in space.


July 1: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat rocket to launch the eighths OneWeb mission (carrying 36 satellites) from the Soyuz launch facility in Vostochny. (As of April 2021)


Mid-July: A Proton rocket to launch the MLM Nauka multi-purpose module to join the Russian Segment of the International Space Station, ISS.

On January 19, 2021, Roskosmos announced that its specialists had completed 80 percent of the planned checks. They included tests of the TV communications system, consisting of TV antenna feeders, TV circuitry, decoding hardware and TV connections at crew work places.

The tests also covered the main and backup sets of the thermal control system, components of the propulsion system (Insider Content) and the motion control and navigation system. The specialists also tested pressurization of the propellant supply system in the high-pressure and low-pressure tanks of the module.

A pair of Proton rockets, along with a Briz-M stage and its payload fairing departed GKNPTs Khrunichev factory for Baikonur during the night from March 15 to 16. According to Roskosmos, the Proton-M/Briz-M rocket was intended for the Luch-5x relay satellite, even though no such spacecraft was known to be in final development at the time. Instead, that rocket was intended for the second Olymp military satellite.

As of March 2021, preparations of the Nauka module have remained on schedule for launch in July of the same year, an industry source told RussianSpaceWeb.com.

1112

The MLM module during processing on Nov. 12, 2020.


October 5: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft (Production No. 749, ISS mission 65S) from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS.

During the early planning of the ISS flight manifest in 2014, the launch of the Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft was planned for September 13, 2021, however in the provisional schedule prepared by Roskosmos at the end of August 2020, the launch of Soyuz MS-19 was slated for October 5, 2021.

At that time, the spacecraft was expected to carry three Russian cosmonauts: Anton Shkaplerov, Sergei Babkin and Mukhtar Aimakhanov, members of the 66th long-duration expedition to the ISS. (By the end of August 2020, Sergei Korsakov replaced Aimakhanov on the crew.) However, in 2020, Roskosmos and the Channel I of the Russian television also discussed sending an actress to the ISS with Soyuz MS-19 to shoot scenes for a sci-fi movie. In October 2020, Channel I promised to start casting for the project.

If the August 2020 schedule worked as planned, Soyuz MS-19 would become the first crew vehicle docking to the nadir (Earth-facing) port of the UM Prichal module added to the Russian Segment of the station less than a month earlier. At the time, the Soyuz MS-19 mission was expected to last 174 days and land on March 28, 2022. However, in the November 2020, draft of the ISS flight manifest, the docking destination for the Soyuz MS-19 mission was shifted to the MIM1 Rassvet module. The mission's launch date (October 5) and its docking destination on the Rassvet module was confirmed in the official ISS flight manifest approved by Roskosmos on Feb. 3, 2021. At the time, the mission was expected to last for 174 days, until March 28, 2022.


October 28: A Soyuz rocket to launch a Progress MS-18 cargo ship (Production No. 447, ISS mission 79P) from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS. During the early planning of the ISS flight manifest in 2014, the second Russian cargo mission of 2021 was planned for April 16, 2021, however in the provisional schedule prepared by Roskosmos at the end of August 2020, the launch of Progress MS-18 was planned for August 18. By November 2020, the start of the mission slipped to October 28.

At the time, the vehicle was expected to dock to the aft port of the Zvezda Service Module, SM, and remain in orbit for 334 days, supporting 65th and 66th long-duration expeditions aboard the ISS.


October-November: A Soyuz-2/Fregat rocket to launch the Luna-Glob (Luna-25) lunar lander from Vostochny.


November 17: A Soyuz rocket to launch a Progress MS-19 cargo ship (Production No. 449, ISS mission 80P) from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS. During the early planning of the ISS flight manifest in 2014, Progress launches were planned for July 1 and October 16, 2021, however in the provisional schedule prepared by Roskosmos at the end of August 2020, the third and final launch of the Russian cargo vehicle to the station in 2021 was planned for November 17.

Progress MS-19 was expected to dock to the zenit (sky-facing) port of the MIM2 Poisk module and continue its mission for 286 days.


November 24: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the UM Prichal module to the International Space Station, ISS.


November 30: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the Meteor-M No. 2-3 remote-sensing satellite and a group of secondary payloads, including a pair of satellites from Moscow State Univeristy, MGU, from Vostochny. (As of April 2021. As of second half of 2020, the launch was expected between August and October 2021).


End of November: A Soyuz-ST/Fregat rocket (Mission VS26) to launch a pair of Galileo navigation satellites from the ELS facility near Kourou, French Guiana. (As of April 2020, the mission was planned for December 15, 2020, but was later delayed until early 2021 and by the beginning of 2021, the mission slipped to the middle of the year and later shifted to October 2021. By March 2021, the launch was planned at the end of November of that year.


December 8: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the Soyuz MS-20 spacecraft (Production No. 752, ISS mission 66S) with a crew of three from Site 31 in Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS. By July 2020, a pair of tourists accompanied by one professional cosmonaut was assigned to the 12-day flight, officially designated Visiting Expedition-20. According to a preliminary flight manifest drafted by Roskosmos at the end of August 2020, the Soyuz MS-20 mission was expected to take place from December 8 to December 20, 2021. According to the original plans, the spacecraft was to dock at the nadir (Earth-facing) port of the MIM1 Rassvet module, a part of the ISS' Russian Segment, however by November 2020, its destination on the ISS was switched to the MIM2 Poisk module.

Soyuz MS-20 was scheduled to land with the same crew on December 20, 2021, after eight days in orbit.


Second half of 2021: A Proton-M/Briz-M rocket to launch the Ekspress-AMU3 and Ekspress-AMU7 communications satellites from Baikonur.


End of 2021: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch a cluster of small payloads from Vostochny, including the second StriX-β radar imaging demonstration satellite. (As of March 2021)

 

Uncertain dates

2021 July 1: A Soyuz rocket to launch a Progress cargo ship from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014)


2021: A Proton-M/Block DM-03 rocket to launch Elektro-L No. 4 satellite from Baikonur. (As of 2019)


Delayed from 2020: An Angara-1.2 rocket to launch the South-Korean Kompsat-6 remote-sensing satellite from Site 35 in Plesetsk. The agreement for the launch in 2020 was announced in July 2016.


2021: A Soyuz-2-1a rocket to launch the second Kondor-FKA radar-carrying satellite. (As of 2019. Postponed from 2019, switched from Rockot/Briz-KM)


Around or after 2021: Russian military to launch the first new-generation Sfera-V military communications satellite. (As of 2016)


2021: A Soyuz-2.1b rocket to launch an Arktika-M (No. 4) satellite. (As of 2010, the mission was expected in 2019. (411) In 2015, the launch postponed until 2021.)


2021: A Soyuz-2/Fregat rocket to launch the Luna-Glob-2 (orbiter) toward the Moon.


2021: A Soyuz-5 launch vehicle to fly its first test mission (As of mid-2014).


 

Cancelled missions

2021: Russia to launch the Ekspress-AT4 communications satellite (as of 2014).


2021: Russia to launch the Ekspress-AT5 communications satellite (as of 2014).


2021: Russia to launch the Ekspress-AMU8 communications satellite (as of 2014).


2021: Russia to launch the first of two Vozvrat-MKA spacecraft. (Postponed indefinitely in April 2015)

 

This page is compiled by Anatoly Zak

Last update: April 13, 2021

All rights reserved

insider content

 

vacuum

Soyuz-2-1a rocket lifts off with the Progress MS-16 cargo ship on Feb. 15, 2021. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


vacuum

Soyuz-2-1b with Arktika-M1 satellite lifts off on Feb. 28, 2021. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


vacuum

Soyuz-2-1a lifts off from Baikonur on March 22, 2021, with CAS-500-1 and 38 secondary payloads. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


vacuum

Soyuz MS-18 lifts off on April 9, 2021. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


FGB-2

The FGB-2/MLM module for the Russian segment of the International Space Station, ISS. Copyright © 2001 Anatoly Zak


docking

As of August 2020, the launch of the UM Prichal module was planned for September 6, 2021. Click to enlarge. Credit: RKK Energia


Lander

A scale model of the Luna-Glob lander presented at the Paris Air and Space Show in Le Bourget in June 2013. Copyright © 2013 Claude Mourier