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Do you participate in spacecraft development? Do you know the status of a particular mission? Please help us to keep this page up to date! (We respect confidentiality of all sources.) Contact: Anatoly Zak


Tsyklon-4M

Tsyklon-4M


Tsyklon

RD-870


 

The author would like to thank Nick Sheppard for corrections.

Russian space program in 2017

According to the Russian government, 173.2 billion rubles would be allocated for the Russian space activities in 2017. It included 92.46 billion for the Federal Space Program and 38.27 billion for the GLONASS constellation. The launch infrastructure was expected to receive 21 billion. Roskosmos earmarked 2.2 billion for the TEM nuclear-electric module under the Prioritized Innovation Projects line item, which is a considerable increase from 1.6 billion initially projected by the Ministry of Finance.

For missions in 2016 click here

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The world's orbital launch attempts in 2017 (as of July 27, 2017 ):

 
Country
Launch date
Time of launch
Payload
Payload type
Launch vehicle
Launch site
Launch complex
Launch pad
Status
1
China
Jan. 5
23:18 Beijing Time
TJSSW-2
Applications / communications
Chang Zheng-3B
Xichang
-
-
Success
2
China
Jan. 9
12:11:12 Beijing Time
Jilin Linye-1, Xing Yun Shiyan-1 (XY-S1), Caton-1
Application / communications
Kuaizhou-1A
Jiuquan
-
-
Success
3
USA
Jan. 14
9:54:34 a.m. PST
Iridium Next (10)
Application / communications
Falcon-9-030
Vandenberg
SLC-4E
-
Success
4
Japan
Jan. 15
08:33 Local time
Tricom-1
Application / communications
SS-520 F4
Uchinoura
-
-
Failure
5
USA
Jan. 20
7:42 p.m. EST
SBIRS-GEO 3
Military / Early warning
Atlas-5 401 (AV-066)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-41
-
Success
6
Japan
Jan. 24
07:44:00 GMT
DSN-2, Kirameki-2 (Superbird-8)
Military / communications
H-2A
Tanegashima
-
-
Success
7
Jan. 27
22:03:34 local time
Application / communications
-
Success
8
Europe
Feb. 14
21:39:07 GMT
Intelsat-32e (SkyBrasil-1), Telkom-3S
Application / communications
Ariane-5 ECA
ELA-3
-
Success
9
India
Feb. 15
03:58 GMT
Cartosat-2D, INS-1A, INS-1B,
Flock-3p-1 (Dove 1000), Flock-3p-2 (Dove 1001), Flock-3p-3 (Dove 1002), Flock-3p-4 (Dove 1003), Flock-3p-5 (Dove 0F18), Flock-3p-6 (Dove 0F35), Flock-3p-7 (Dove 100B),
Flock-3p-8 (Dove 100C), Flock-3p-9 (Dove 1021), Flock-3p-10 (Dove 1022), Flock-3p-11 (Dove 101F), Flock-3p-12 (Dove 1010), Flock-3p-13 (Dove 1016), Flock-3p-14 (Dove 1018),
Flock-3p-15 (Dove 101D), Flock-3p-16 (Dove 100E), Flock-3p-17 (Dove 1023),
Flock-3p-18 (Dove 102B), Flock-3p-19 (Dove 1024), Flock-3p-20 (Dove 1029), Flock-3p-21 (Dove 102A), Flock-3p-22 (Dove 1028), Flock-3p-23 (Dove 1025), Flock-3p-24 (Dove 1026), Flock-3p-25 (Dove 102F),
Flock-3p-26 (Dove 102D), Flock-3p-27 (Dove 1030),
Flock-3p-28 (Dove 102C),
Flock-3p-29 (Dove 1033), Flock-3p-30 (Dove 102E), Flock-3p-31 (Dove 1032), Flock-3p-32 (Dove 1035), Flock-3p-33 (Dove 103C), Flock-3p-34 (Dove 103B), Flock-3p-35 (Dove 103D), Flock-3p-36 (Dove 103A), Flock-3p-37 (Dove 1037), Flock-3p-38 (Dove 1036), Flock-3p-39 (Dove 103E), Flock-3p-40 (Dove 1039), Flock-3p-41 (Dove 1031), Flock-3p-42 (Dove 101E), Flock-3p-43 (Dove 1041), Flock-3p-44 (Dove 1019), Flock-3p-45 (Dove 101A), Flock-3p-46 (Dove 1011), Flock-3p-47 (Dove 1027), Flock-3p-48 (Dove 1042), Flock-3p-49 (Dove 1038), Flock-3p-50 (Dove 1034), Flock-3p-51 (Dove 1006), Flock-3p-52 (Dove 1044), Flock-3p-53 (Dove 1007), Flock-3p-54 (Dove 1005), Flock-3p-55 (Dove 1008), Flock-3p-56 (Dove 100F), Flock-3p-57 (Dove 1014), Flock-3p-58 (Dove 1009), Flock-3p-59 (Dove 1045), Flock-3p-60 (Dove 101B), Flock-3p-61 (Dove 1012), Flock-3p-62 (Dove 1046), Flock-3p-63 (Dove 1015), Flock-3p-64 (Dove 100A), Flock-3p-65 (Dove 1040), Flock-3p-66 (Dove 1013), Flock-3p-67 (Dove 1017), Flock-3p-68 (Dove 1004), Flock-3p-69 (Dove 0F43), Flock-3p-70 (Dove 0F15), Flock-3p-71 (Dove 0F11), Flock-3p-72 (Dove 0F10), Flock-3p-73 (Dove 0F1B), Flock-3p-74 (Dove 0F22), Flock-3p-75 (Dove 0F12), Flock-3p-76 (Dove 0F17), Flock-3p-77 (Dove 0F28), Flock-3p-78 (Dove 0F51), Flock-3p-79 (Dove 0F52), Flock-3p-80 (Dove 0F4E), Flock-3p-81 (Dove 0F25), Flock-3p-82 (Dove 0F41), Flock-3p-83 (Dove 0F3F), Flock-3p-84 (Dove 0F42), Flock-3p-85 (Dove 0F1D), Flock-3p-86 (Dove 0F34), Flock-3p-87 (Dove 0F31), Flock-3p-88 (Dove 0F38), Lemur-2 22 (Lemur-2 Jobanputra), Lemur-2-23 (Lemur-2 Spire-Minions), Lemur-2 24 (Lemur-2 Satchmo), Lemur-2-25 (Lemur-2 Rdeaton), Lemur-2-26 (Lemur-2 Smita-Sharad), Lemur-2 27 (Lemur-2 Mia-Grace), Lemur-2-28 (Lemur-2 Noguescorreig), Lemur-2-29 (Lemur-2 Tachikoma), BGUSat, DIDO-2 (Chen Jiayong-1), PEASSS, Al-Farabi-1,
Nayif-1 (FUNcube 5)
Application / remote sensing
PSLV-XL (C37)
Sriharikota
-
-
Success
10
USA
Feb. 19
9:38:59.5 a.m. EST
Dragon SpX-10 (CRS-10)
Manned / cargo supply
Falcon-9
Cape Canaveral
39
A
Success
11
Feb. 22
08:58:33 Moscow Time
Manned / cargo supply
5
Success
12
USA
March 1
17:50 GMT
NROL-79 NOSS-3: Intruder-8A, Intruder-8B
Military / reconnaissance
Atlas-5- 401 (AV-068)
Vandenberg
SLC-3E
E
Success
13
China
March 3
07:53 Beijing Time
Tiankong-1 (TK-1)
Application / remote sensing
Kaituozhe-2 (KT-2A)
Jiuquan
-
-
Success
14
Europe
March 6
10:49:24 p.m. Guiana Time
Sentinel-2B
Application / remote sensing
-
Success
15
USA
March 16
06:00 GMT
Echostar-23
Application / communications
Falcon-9 (031)
Cape Canaveral
39A
A
Success
16
Japan
March 17
01:20:00 GMT
IGS Radar-5
Military / reconnaissance
H-2A (F33)
Tanegashima
-
-
Success
17
USA
March 19
00:18 GMT
WGS-9
Military / communications
Delta-4 M+ (5,4)
Cape Canaveral
37B
B
Success
18
USA
March 30
6:30 p.m.
SES-10
Applications / communications
Falcon-9
Cape Canaveral
39A
A
Success
19
China
April 12
19:04 Beijing Time
Shijian-13 (SJ-13/ChinaSat-16/Zhongxing-16)
Applications / communications
Chang Zheng-3B/G2
Xichang
LC2
2
Success
20
US
April 18
11:11:26 a.m. EDT
Cygnus OA-7 (CRS-7) S.S. John Glenn
Manned / cargo supply
Atlas-5
Cape Canaveral
41
-
Success
21
April 20
10:13:43 Moscow Time
Soyuz-FG
5
Success
22
China
April 20
19:41 Beijing Time
Tianzhou-1
Manned / cargo supply
Chang Zheng-7
Wenchang
-
-
Success
23 USA May 1 7:15 a.m. EDT NROL-76 (USA-276) Military / reconnaissance Falcon-9 v1.2 (033) Cape Canaveral 39A A Success
24 Europe May 4 21:50 GMT Koreasat-7 (Mugungwa-7), SFDC-1 Applications / communications Ariane-5 ECA (VA-236) Kourou ELA-3 - Success
25 India May 5 11:27 GMT GSAT-9 (South Asia Sat) Application / communications GSLV Mk2 (F09) Sriharikota SLP - Success
26 USA May 15 7:21 p.m. EDT Inmarsat-5 F4 Application / communications Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral (KSC) 39A A Success
27 Russia May 18 08:54:53 a.m. French Guiana time SES-15 Application / communications Soyuz-ST-A Kourou ELS - Success
28 USA May 25 16:20:00 New Zealand Time It's a test Test Electron MAH, NZ - - Failure
29 Russia May 25 09:34 Moscow Time EKS-2/Tundra Military / Early warning Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat-M Plesetsk - - Success
30 Japan June 1 9:17:46 a.m. Japan Time Michibiki No. 2 Quasi-Zenith Satellite System Application / navigation H-2A (F34) Tanegashima - - Success
31 Europe June 1 8:45 p.m. French Guiana Time ViaSat-2, Eutelsat-172B Application / communications Ariane-5 ECA Kourou ELA-3 - Success
32 USA June 3 5:07 p.m. Eastern Time Dragon CRS-11 Manned / cargo suppy Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral 39 A Success
33 India June 5 17:28 India Standart Time GSAT-19 Application / communications GSLV-Mk 3-D1 Sriharikota 2 - Success
34 Russia June 8 06:45:47 Moscow Time EchoStar-21 Application / communications Proton-M/Briz-M Baikonur 81 24 Success
35 Russia June 14 12:20:13.120 Moscow Time Progress MS-06 Manned / cargo suppy Soyuz-2-1a Baikonur 31 6 Success
36 China June 15 11:00 Beijing Time Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT), Zhuhai-1A (OVS-1A),
Zhuhai-1B (OVS-1B),
ÑuSat-3 (Aleph-1-3/Milanesat)
Science / astrophysics Chang Zheng-4B Jiuquan 43 603 Success
37 China June 18 08:11 Beijing Time Zhongxing-9A (ChinaSat-9A) Application / communications Chang Zheng-3B Xichang LC2 - Partial success
38 India June 23 03:59 UTC Cartosat-2E
NIUSAT (Keralshree)
CE-SAT-1
Max Valier Sat
Venta-1
CICERO-6
Lemur-2 34 (Lemur-2 ShainaJohl)
Lemur-2-35 (Lemur-2 XueniTerence)
Lemur-2-36 (Lemur-2 LucyBryce)
Lemur-2-37 (Lemur-2 KungFoo)
Lemur-2-38 (Lemur-2 McPeake)
Lemur-2-39 (Lemur-2 Sam-Amelia)
Lemur-2 40 (Lemur-2 Lisasaurus)
Lemur-2-41 (Lemur-2 Lynsey-Symo)
Blue Diamond
Green Diamond
Red Diamond
COMPASS 2 (DragSail-Cubesat, QB50 DE04)
InflateSail (QB50 GB06)
LituanicaSAT 2 (QB50 LT01)
URSA MAIOR (QB50 IT02)
NUDTSat (QB50 CN06)
Pegasus (QB50 AT03)
UCLSat (QB50 GB03)
VZLUsat 1 (QB50 CZ02)
D-Sat
Tyvak-53b
Aalto-1
ROBUSTA-1B
SUCHAI
skCUBE
Application / remote sensing PSLV-XL C38 (FLP) Sriharikota - - Success
39 Russia June 23 21:04:33 Moscow Time Kosmos-2519 (Napryazhenie) Military / geodesy Soyuz-2-1v Plesetsk Site 43 - Success
40 USA June 23 3:10 p.m. EDT BulgariaSat-1 Applications / communications Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral 39A A Success
41 USA June 13 1:25:14 p.m. PDT

Iridium Next F2-1, Iridium Next F2-2, Iridium Next F2-3, Iridium Next F2-4, Iridium Next F2-5, Iridium Next F2-6, Iridium Next F2-7, Iridium Next F2-8, Iridium Next F2-9, Iridium Next F2-10

Applications / communications Falcon-9 Vandenberg SLC-4E E Success
42 Europe June 28 6:15 p.m. French Guiana Hellas Sat 3-Inmarsat S EAN, GSAT-17 Applications / communications Ariane-5 Kourou ELA-3 - Success
43 China July 2 19:23:23.425 Local time Shijian-18 Application / communications Chang Zheng-5 Wenchang 101 - Failure
44 USA July 5 7:38 p.m. EDT Intelsat-35e Application / communications Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral 39A A Success
45 Russia July 14 09:36:49 Moscow Time

Kanopus-V-IK, Flying Laptop, WNISAT-1R,
TechnoSat,
NORSAT-1,
NORSAT-2,
CICERO 1,
CICERO 2,
CICERO 3,
Corvus-BC 1 (Landmapper-BC 1),
Corvus-BC 2 (Landmapper-BC 2),
MKA-N 1,
MKA-N 2,
Flock-2k-1 (Dove 0F1A),
Flock-2k-2 (Dove 0F1E),
Flock-2k-3 (Dove 0F21),
Flock-2k-4 (Dove 0F24),
Flock-2k-5 (Dove 0F29),
Flock-2k-6 (Dove 0F2A),
Flock-2k-7 (Dove 0F2B),
Flock-2k-8 (Dove 0F2D),
Flock-2k-9 (Dove 0F2E),
Flock-2k-10 (Dove 0F32),
Flock-2k-11 (Dove 0F33),
Flock-2k-12 (Dove 0F36),
Flock-2k-13 (Dove 0F37),
Flock-2k-14 (Dove 0F3B),
Flock-2k-15 (Dove 0F3C),
Flock-2k-16 (Dove 0F3D),
Flock-2k-17 (Dove 0F40),
Flock-2k-18 (Dove 0F44),
Flock-2k-19 (Dove 0F46),
Flock-2k-20 (Dove 0F47),
Flock-2k-21 (Dove 0F49),
Flock-2k-22 (Dove 0F4A),
Flock-2k-23 (Dove 0F4B),
Flock-2k-24 (Dove 0F4F),
Flock-2k-25 (Dove 0F4D),
Flock-2k-26 (Dove 0F53),
Flock-2k-27 (Dove 0F54),
Flock-2k-28 (Dove 1047),
Flock-2k-29 (Dove 1048),
Flock-2k-30 (Dove 1049),
Flock-2k-31 (Dove 104A),
Flock-2k-32 (Dove 104B),
Flock-2k-33 (Dove 104C),
Flock-2k-34 (Dove 104D),
Flock-2k-35 (Dove 104E),
Flock-2k-36 (Dove 104F),
Flock-2k-37 (Dove 1050),
Flock-2k-38 (Dove 1051),
Flock-2k-39 (Dove 1052),
Flock-2k-40 (Dove 1053),
Flock-2k-41 (Dove 1054),
Flock-2k-42 (Dove 1055),
Flock-2k-43 (Dove 1056),
Flock-2k-44 (Dove 1020),
Flock-2k-45 (Dove 100D),
Flock-2k-46 (Dove 103F),
Flock-2k-47 (Dove 1043),
Flock-2k-48 (Dove 101C),
Lemur-2 42, Lemur-2 43,
Lemur-2 44,
Lemur-2 45,
Lemur-2 46,
Lemur-2 47,
Lemur-2 48,
Lemur-2 49,
NanoACE,
Mayak, Iskra-MAI-85, Ecuador-UTE-YuZGU

Application / remote-sensing Soyuz-2-1a/Fregat Baikonur Site 31 6 Success

 

The 2017 space launch score card (as of July 27, 2017 ):

***
Country
Launch vehicle
Launch vehicle
Launch vehicle
Launch vehicle
Launch vehicle
Launch vehicle
Total
Failed
1
USA
Falcon-9: 10
Atlas-5: 3
Delta-4: 1
Electron: 1*
-
-
15
1*
2
-
-
9
0
3
China
Chang Zheng-3B: 3 (1**)
Kuaizhou-1A: 1
Kaituozhe-2A: 1
Chang Zheng-7: 1
Chang Zheng-4B: 1
Chang Zheng-5: 1*
8
2*
4
Europe
Ariane-5: 4
Vega: 1
-
-
-
-
5
0
5
Japan
SS-520: 1**
H-2A: 3
-
-
-
-
4
1
6
India
PSLV: 2
GSLV Mk2: 1
GSLV-Mk 3: 1
-
-
-
4
0
-
World:
-
-
-
-
-
-
45
4

*Did not reach orbit; **Entered wrong orbit but payload can be salvaged; ***In case of an equal number of launches, the country that reached that number first is listed at the top;

 

Planned Russian space missions in 2017:

July 28: A Soyuz-FG rocket to launch the Soyuz MS-05 spacecraft with a crew of three to ISS.

August 17: A Proton rocket to launch Blagovest No. 11L military communications satellite from Baikonur. The launch was previously planned for September and October 2016 and the end of June 2017. On July 3, 2017, ISS Reshetnev, the spacecraft manufacturer, announced that the satellite had been delivered to the launch site.

End of August: A Proton rocket to launch a satellite from Baikonur for Hispasat organization of Madrid, Spain. The satellite will be one of the two satellites that Space Systems Loral LLC (SSL) of Palo Alto, California is building for Hispasat: Hispasat-1F or Amazonas-5. Both weigh approximately five metric tons. According to the International Launch Service, ILS, which markets Protons to commercial customers, it will dual integrate both missions and Hispasat will have the flexibility to determine the satellite-to-launcher assignments very late, based on business and schedule considerations. With those two new satellites, Hispasat will be able to meet growing satellite capacity demand, mainly for satellite television platforms in regional locations and Ka-band capacity providing new Internet connectivity services, the ILS said. The satellites will have an expected useful life of 15 years and will be built on SSL's flight-proven 1300 platform. An agreement for the launch was announced on Sept. 14, 2015. The mission was previously planned at the end of July 2017.

Last week of September: A Proton-M/Briz-M rocket to launch the AsiaSat-9 satellite from Baikonur. On June 22, 2012, the International Launch Services, ILS, which markets Proton to commercial customers, announced a contract with Asia Satellite Telecommunications Co. Ltd. to launch one of the company's future satellites, AsiaSat-6, AsiaSat-8 or AsiaSat-9, a replacement satellite to be procured for AsiaSat 4. The launch contract had included an option for AsiaSat to order one additional launch service from ILS for any of its upcoming three satellites, ILS said. At the time, the first launch was expected as early as 2014. By the end of May 2016, delays with the manufacturing of the satellite pushed the mission from November 2016 to 2017. The mission was postponed from November 2016.

Sept. 12: A Soyuz rocket to launch the Soyuz MS-6 manned transport spacecraft from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014, the launch was planned for Sept. 30.)

Oct. 12: A Soyuz rocket to launch a Progress MS-7 cargo ship from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014, the launch was scheduled for April 16.)

October: A Zenit rocket to launch the Angosat communications satellite for the government of Angola. (As of middle of 2016. Postponed from November-December 2016 and moved from the second mission of the Angara-5 rocket.)

Dec. 27: A Soyuz rocket to launch a Soyuz MS-7 manned transport spacecraft with a crew of three from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014, the launch was planned for Nov. 30.)


Lybid

End of 2017: A Zenit-3SLB/Fregat-SB to launch the Ukrainian Lybid communications satellite from Baikonur.

When first announced in 2006, the Lybid spacecraft was expected to fly in 2010, but it was later postponed until September 2011. In April 2010, the launch was promised in April 2012. The mission was then delayed until the fourth quarter of 2013. In August 2014, Ukrainian space agency said that the spacecraft would be ready for launch in the fourth quarter of that year, however political problems between Russia and Ukraine kept the spacecraft on the ground.

Only in March 2017, there were first signs that the Lybid program might have a chance to get off the ground. In an interview with the Interfax-Ukraine news agency, Acting Head of Ukrainian Space Agency, GKAU, Yuri Radchenko said that before the end of that month, the Yuzhmash factory in Dnepr, Ukraine, was expected to pay Moscow-based NPO Energomash for the RD-171 engine to be installed on the fully assembled first stage of the Zenit rocket slated to launch Lybid. At the same time, industry sources said that personnel at Yuzhmash had began testing a fully assembled second stage of the Zenit for the Lybid mission.


Uncertain dates in 2017:

Fourth quarter: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat-M to launch GLONASS-K1 No. 14 (Block K4s) navigation satellite from Plesetsk. The launch was postponed from 2016.

End of 2017: A Proton rocket to launch the Yamal-501 communications satellite from Baikonur.

End of 2017: A Proton rocket to launch the Elektro-L No. 3 satellite from Baikonur.

Oct. 16: A Soyuz rocket to launch a Progress MS-9 cargo ship from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014)

Third quarter: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat-M to launch GLONASS-K1 No. 13 (Block K3s) navigation satellite from Plesetsk. The launch was postponed from 2016.

Third quarter: A Rockot/Briz-KM vehicle to launch the first Gonets-M1 satellite from Plesetsk. (The mission postponed from the fall of 2016).

Postponed from July 1: A Soyuz rocket to launch a Progress MS-8 cargo ship from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014)

Postponed from second quarter: A Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat rocket to launch a GLONASS-K2 satellite from Plesetsk. The mission was postponed from 2015.

Postponed from May or June: Russian military to launch a trio of Rodnik (14S137) communications satellites from Plesetsk.

2017: Russia to launch Geo-IK-2 No. 3 geodesic satellite for the Russian Ministry of Defense. (As of 2016.)

2017: A Soyuz-2.1b rocket to launch the 2,100-kilogram Arktika-M No. 1 remote-sensing satellite into a highly elliptical 12-hour orbit (perigee: 800-2,500 kilometers, inclination: 62.8-63.5 degrees) from Baikonur. The constellation is designed to monitor high-altitude areas of the Earth. The spacecraft is to be based on the Elektro weather-forecasting satellite. In 2008, the first pair of Arktika-M satellites was expected to fly in 2013. (299), but by December 2010, the mission slipped to 2014. (442) By 2012, the first launch was promised in 2015 and the second in 2016. In the middle of 2015, the launch was postponed from 2016 to 2017.

2017: A Proton rocket to launch the 5th trio of GLONASS-K1 navigation satellites (No. 15, 16 and 17/Block K5) from Baikonur.

2017: A Proton rocket to launch Ekspress-AMU4 and Ekspress-MD3 communications satellites from Baikonur.

2017: A Soyuz-2-1b rocket with a Fregat upper stage to launch the Meteor-M No. 3 remote-sensing satellite. (As of the end of 2009, the launch was promised in 2012, however by that year, the launch slipped to 2016. It was later postponed to 2017.)

2017: Russia to launch first GLONASS-KM navigation satellites. Launched in pairs on Angara/Briz-M rockets or one by one on Soyuz-2/Fregat rockets.

2017: Russia to launch the Kartograf-OE No. 1 remote-sensing satellite. (Before 2012, the launch was expected as early as 2014).

2017: Russia to launch Smotr-R No. 1 remote-sensing satellite.


Postponed from 2015:

End of 2015 - end of 2016: A Soyuz or Vega rocket to launch the 200-kilogram Taranis satellite into a quasi-sun-synchronous orbit with an altitude of 700 kilometers. Developed by the French space agency, CNES, the Taranis satellite (Tool for the Analysis of RAdiation from lightNIng and Sprites) will be a secondary payload during a mission to deliver multiple spacecraft. The satellite will study magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere coupling via transient processes, focusing in particular on two aspects: determining the characteristics and frequency of transient luminous events (TLE) involved in the coupling between the ionosphere and atmosphere, and characterizing the electron beams accelerated from the atmosphere to the magnetosphere. The contract for the mission between Toulouse Space Center and Arianespace was announced on July 9, 2012. The agreement also included options for the launch of two other CNES satellites, Microscope and Merlin.

Postponed from December 2015: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat rocket to launch the Meteor-M No. 2-1 remote-sensing satellite, along with a cluster of secondary payloads, including Ionosfera-1, Ionosfera-2, Flying Laptop, Flock 2, Scout, AISSat-3, Perseus-O1, Perseus-O2.

Postponed from 2015: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch a Pion-NKS electronic intelligence satellite from Plesetsk. (As of 2014)

Postponed from 2015: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch a cluster of Globalstar satellites from Baikonur. (As of March 2013)

Postponed from 2015: Soyuz rocket to launch the Foton-M No. 5 spacecraft. The spacecraft is expected to be equipped with solar panels, modified service module, and the new liquid-propellant orbit correction engine. The orbital life span of the satellite to be launched into the 400-450-kilometer orbit was expected to increase to 60 days. (As of April 2009)

Postponed from around 2015: Russia to launch Kosmos-SKh satellite to monitor agricultural development from space.

Postponed from 2015: Russia to launch the Kartograf-OE No. 2 remote-sensing satellite.

Postponed from 2015: A Rockot booster to make three flights with military payloads from Pad 3 at Site 133 in Plesetsk. (As of middle of 2014)


Postponed from 2016:

Oct. 31: A Rockot booster to launch the 900-kilogram Sentinel-5P remote-sensing satellite from Plesetsk. (As of January 2014, the launch was expected at the beginning of 2016 and was also expected in mid-April and mid July 2016. As of June 2017, the launch was expected in September 2017.)

2016: A Soyuz-2-1b rocket to launch the second satellite for the EKS early-warning constellation from Plesetsk. (As of December 2015)

A Soyuz-2.1b rocket to launch the Arktika-R No. 1 satellite into the polar orbit for radar observations of the polar areas. Originally a pair of Arktika-R satellites was planned for launch in 2014, by the end of 2010, the introduction of the system slipped to 2015. (442) By 2012, the second Arktika-R satellite was postponed to 2016.

2016: A Rockot or Soyuz-2-1v to launch a trio of Gonets-M communications satellites from Plesetsk.

2016: A Proton-M/DM-03 rocket to launch the Ekspress-AMU-2 communications satellite from Baikonur.

2016: A Rockot booster to launch its final military payload from Plesetsk.

2016: A Soyuz-2.1b rocket to launch the Arktika-R No. 2 satellite into the polar orbit for radar observations of the polar areas.

2016: Angara-1.2 to fly its first test mission from Plesetsk.

2016: Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat-SB rocket to launch the Arkon-2M No. 2 remote-sensing satellites for all-weather radar observations of the Earth surface from a 550-600-kilometer Sun-synchronous orbit. In 2010, a pair of spacecraft was scheduled for launch in 2013, however by 2012, the first Arkon-2M was expected to fly in 2015 and the second in 2016. The Arkon-2M program was canceled by November 2012.


Canceled Russian missions

Aug. 5: A Dnepr rocket to launch a pair of GRACE-FO scientific satellites for the European Space Agency, ESA, from a silo facility 370/13 in Dombarovsky. The mission was switched to a Falcon-9 rocket.

2017: Russia to launch Arkon-2 No. 1 radar remote-sensing satellite. As of 2008, the first launch of Arkon-2 was promised in 2011 (299), however during 2010-2012 period, the mission was expected in 2017.

2017: The Baiterek launch complex in Baikonur to host its first mission of the Angara rocket. (As of end of 2010. As of 2008, the first Angara mission from Baikonur was promised in 2012; by 2009, it slipped to 2014 and by 2011 to 2017. The program was canceled in 2012).

2017-2018: A Soyuz rocket with a Fregat upper stage to launch the first pair of a quartet of satellites from Plesetsk to study plasma within the Roy ("Swarm") project. Each 200-kilogram spacecraft would be based on the Karat platform with plasma-electric engines and carry around 60 kilograms of payload. Each spacecraft would carry a single magnetometer boom and four booms for measurement of Earth's electric field.

2017: A Dnepr rocket with a Krechet upper stage to launch Ukrainian Selena mini-orbiter toward the Moon. Developed by KB Yuzhnoe, Selena would be the first spacecraft in post-Soviet Ukraine designed to go beyond the Earth orbit. (Plans as of November 2011.) Ukrainian plans for developing a lunar station had been publicized during the crisis with the Russian Phobos-Grunt spacecraft and, possibly, were timed to facilitate contacts with Russia on a potential cooperative project in deep space. Ukraine's previous plans to launch a 300-kilogram lunar orbiter on the Zenit rocket stalled due to lack of funds. However, by scaling down the project to fit into a converted ballistic missile and, possibly, joining forces with Russia, could make the proposal affordable. It could be speculated, that after the Phobos-Grunt fiasco, Russian space strategists could be under pressure to fly an inexpensive test mission into deep-space before returning to ambitious and expensive planetary missions.

 


For missions in 2018 click here

This page is compiled by Anatoly Zak; Last update: July 27, 2017

Page editor: Alain Chabot, Nick Sheppard; Last edit: April 30, 2011

All rights reserved

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ascent

Soyuz-2-1a lifts off on July 14, 2017. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


blagovest

Blagovest military communications satellite. Credit: ISS Reshetnev