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Do you participate in spacecraft development? Do you know the status of a particular mission? Please help us to keep this page up to date! (We respect confidentiality of all sources.) Contact: Anatoly Zak


Space exploration in 2016

For space missions in 2015 click here

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The world's orbital launch attempts in 2016 (as of July 19, 2016 ):

 
Country
Launch date
Time of launch
Payload
Payload type
Launch vehicle
Launch site
Launch complex
Launch pad
Status
1
China
Jan. 16
00:57 Beijing Time
Belintersat-1
Application / communication
Chang Zheng-3B
Xichang
LC-3
3
Success
2
US
Jan. 17
10:42 a.m. Pacific Time
Jason-3
Science / Oceanography
Falcon-9 v1.1
Vandenberg
SLC-4E
E
Success
3
India
Jan. 20
04:01 UTC
IRNSS-1E
Application / navigation
PSLV-C31 (XL)
Sriharikota
-
-
Success
4
Europe
Jan. 27
8:20:41 p.m. Guiana time
Intelsat-29e (EpicNG)
Application / communications
Ariane-5 ECA
3
Success
5
Jan. 30
01:20:09.03 Moscow Time
Application / communications
39
Success
6
China
Feb. 1
3:29 p.m. Beijing Time
Beidou-3 M3-S (No. 21)
Application / navigation
Chang Zheng-3C
Xichang
2
-
Success
7
US
Feb. 5
8:38 a.m. EST
GPS-2F-12 (SV-9)
Application / navigation
Atlas-5-401 (AV-057)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-41
41
Success
8
Feb. 7
03:21:07 Moscow Time
Military / navigation
4
Success
9
North Korea
Feb. 7
09:31 Korean Time
Kwangmyongsong-4
Application / remote sensing
Unha
Sohae
-
-
Success
10
US
Feb. 10
11:40:32 GMT
NROL-45/USA-267 (Topaz-4)
Military
Delta-4M+ (5,2)
Vandenberg
SLC-6
6
Success
11
Feb. 16
20:57:45 Moscow Time
Application / remote sensing
-
Success
12
Japan
Feb. 17
5:45 p.m. Japan Standard Time
Astro-H (Hitomi), ChubuSat-2 (Kinshachi-2), ChubuSat-3 (Kinshachi-3), HORYU-IV (AEGIS)
Science / astronomy
H-2A F30
Tanegashima
-
-
Success
13
US
March 4
6:35 p.m. EST
SES-9
Application / communications
Falcon-9 v1.1 (modified)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
14
Europe
March 9
2:20 a.m. Guiana time
Eutelsat-65 West A
Applications / communications
Ariane-5 ECA
-
Success
15
India
March 10
10:31 GMT
IRNSS-1F
Application / navigation
PSLV (XL) C32
Sriharikota
-
-
Success
16
March 13
21:56:00.333 Moscow Time
Application / remote sensing
6
Success
17
12:31:42 Moscow Time
39
Success
18
March 19
00:26:38.355 Moscow Time
Manned
5
Success
19
US
March 22
11:05 p.m. EDT
Cygnus OA-6 (CRS5)
Manned / cargo supply
Atlas-5 401 (AV-064)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-41
41
Success
20
March 24
12:42:00.241 Moscow Time
Bars-M2 (Kosmos-2515)
Military / cartography
4
Success
21
China
March 30
4:11:04 a.m. Bejing Time
Beidou-2-IGSO6 (No. 22)
Application / navigation
Chang Zheng-3A
Xichang
LC2
-
Success
22
March 31
19:23:57.351 Moscow Time
Manned / cargo supply
6
Success
23
China
April 6
01:38 Beijing Time
Shijian-10
Science / material science
Chang Zheng-2D
Jiuquan
43/603
-
Success
24
US
April 8
4:43 p.m. EDT
Dragon SpX-8
Manned / cargo supply
Falcon-9
Cape Canaveral
40
-
Success
25
April 25
06:02:13 p.m. Guiana Time
Application / remote-sensing
-
Success
26
05:01:21 Moscow Time
Lomonosov, Aist-2D, SamSat-218
Science / astrophysics
-
Success
27
India
April 28
07:20 GMT
IRNSS-1G
Application / navigation
PSLV (XL) C33
Sriharikota
-
-
Success
28
USA
May 6
01:21 a.m. EDT
JCSat-14
Application / communications
Falcon-9
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
29
China
May 15
02:43 GMT
Yaogan Weixin-30
Military / reconnaissance
Chang Zheng-2D
Jiuquan
43/603
-
Success
30
May 24
05:48:43 French Guiana Time
Application / navigation
-
Success
31
US
May 27
5:39 p.m. EDT
Thaicom-8
Application / communications
Falcon-9 (025)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
32
May 29
11:44:35.411 Moscow Time
Military / navigation
4
Success*
33
China
May 30
11:17 Beijing Time
Ziyuan ZY-3, Ñusat-1 Fresco, Ñusat-2 Batata
Application / remote sensing
Chang Zheng-4B
Taiyuan
-
-
Success
34
June 4
17:00 Moscow Time
Military / geodesy
3
Success
35
June 8
10:10:00.019 Moscow Time
Application / communications
24
Success
36 USA June 11 1:51 p.m. EDT NROL-37 (Orion-9, Mentor-7 Military Delta-4-Heavy Cape Canaveral SLC-37B B Success
37 China June 12 23:30 Beijing Time Beidou-2-G7 (No. 23) Application / navigation Chang Zheng-3C Xichang LC-3 3 Success
38 USA June 15 10:29 a.m. EDT Eutelsat-117 West B (Satmex-9), ABS-2A Application / communications Falcon-9 (026) Cape Canaveral SLC-40 - Success
39 Europe June 18 18:38 p.m. French Guiana time EchoStar-18, BRisat Application / communications Ariane-5 ECA (VA230) Kourou ELA-3 - Success
40 India June 22 03:55 UTC Cartosat-2C, GHGSat-D, BIROS, Swayam, SathyaBamaSat, Skysat-C1, Dove (3x4), Lapan-A3, M3MSat Application / remote sensing PSLV (XL) C34
Sriharikota
-
-
Success
41 USA June 24 10:30 a.m. EDT MUOS-5 Military / communications Atlas-5 551 (AV-063)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-41
-
Success
42 China June 25 20:30 Beijing Time

Descent module prototype, Ao Long Yi Hao, Aoxiang Zhixing, Tiange Feixingqi-1, Tiange Feixingqi-2

Experimental Chang Zheng-7/YZ-1A
Wenchang
-
-
Success
43 China June 29 11:21 Beijing Time Shijian-16-02 Military / Electronic intelligence Chang Zheng-4B
Jiuquan
-
-
Success
44 Russia July 7 04:36:40.208 Moscow Time Soyuz MS-01 Manned Soyuz-FG
5
Success
45 Russia July 17 00:41:46 Moscow Time Progress MS-03 Manned/ cargo supply Soyuz-U
6
Success
46 US July 18 04:45:29.318 GMT Dragon SpX-9 Manned/ cargo supply Falcon-9-027
Capte Canaveral
40
-
Success

*Third stage underperformed during the launch; compensated by Fregat's extended firing.

 

The 2016 space launch score card (as of July 19, 2016 ):

-
Country
Launch vehicle
Launch vehicle
Launch-vehicle
Launch-vehicle
Launch-vehicle
Launch-vehicle
Total
Failed
1
-
-
16
0
2
USA
Falcon-9 v1.1: 7
Atlas-5 401: 3
Delta-4: 1
Delta-4 Heavy
-
-
12
0
3
China
Chang Zheng-3B: 1
Chang Zheng-3C: 2
Chang Zheng-3A: 1
Chang Zheng-2D: 2
Chang Zheng-4B: 2
Chang Zheng-7: 1
9
0
4
India
PSLV (XL): 4
-
-
-
-
-
4
0
5
Europe
Ariane-5 ECA: 3
-
-
-
-
-
3
0
6
North Korea
Unha: 1
-
-
-
-
-
1
0
7
Japan
H-2A: 1
-
-
-
-
-
1
0
-
World:
-
-
-
-
-
-
46
0

 

PLANNED RUSSIAN SPACE LAUNCHES IN 2016:

Aug. 29: A Proton-M/Briz-M rocket to launch the 6,900-kilogram EchoStar-21 (T2) satellite for EchoStar Satellite Services of Englewood, Colorado. The International Launch Services, ILS, which markets Protons overseas, announced an agreement to launch an unspecified EchoStar satellite on May 13, 2013. (The mission was originally planned at the end of 2015 or beginning of 2016. During 2016, it was postoponed to early June, then to June 25 and by the end of May it was expected at the end of August.)

Sept. 23: A Soyuz-FG rocket to launch the Soyuz MS-2 transport spacecraft with a crew of three from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS. (The launch was previously scheduled for Sept. 30, 2016.)

September of October: A Proton rocket to launch Blagovest No. 11L military communications satellite from Baikonur.

Oct. 20: A Soyuz-U rocket to launch a Progress MS-4 cargo ship from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS. (Postponed from July 1)

October: A Soyuz-2.1a/Fregat to launch Kanopus-V-IK satellite and a cluster of secondary payloads from Baikonur. Kanopus-V-IK was delayed from 2013 and 2015 and moved from Rockot in Plesetsk to Soyuz-2-1a in Baikonur).

Oct. 31: A Rockot booster to launch the 900-kilogram Sentinel-5P remote-sensing satellite from Plesetsk. (As of January 2014, the launch was expected at the beginning of 2016 and was also expected in mid-April and mid July 2016.)

Nov. 6: A Soyuz-FG rocket to launch the Soyuz MS-3 transport spacecraft with a crew of three from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS. (The launch was previously scheduled for Nov. 30 and Nov. 16, 2016.)

2016: A Soyuz-2-1b rocket to launch the second satellite for the EKS early-warning constellation from Plesetsk. (As of December 2015)

Postponed from February: A Proton-M rocket to launch the Yamal-601 satellite for Gazprom Space Systems, a division of the largest Russian oil and natural gas producer. The Yamal 601 satellite, weighing over 5,700 kilograms, will be built by Thales Alenia Space on the flight proven Spacebus-4000 platform. The satellite will be launched into geostationary transfer orbit and has an anticipated service lifetime of 15 years. Yamal 601 satellite will replace Yamal 202 and will provide fixed communications and transmission services in C-band over Europe, the Middle East, Northern Africa and South-East Asia from the orbital position at 49 degrees East longitude. This satellite is also designed for development of business in Ku- and Ka-bands in the Russian market.

The mission marked the second Russian company switching from domestic communications satellite developers to foreign suppliers. Previously, Russian Satellite Communications Company, RSCC, also gave contracts to non-Russian satellite producers.

The International Launch Services, ILS, a US-based company that markets the Proton rocket to commercial customers, announced the contract for the launch of Yamal-601 on Jan. 22, 2014.


Postponed from 2015:

End of 2015 - end of 2016: A Soyuz or Vega rocket to launch the 200-kilogram Taranis satellite into a quasi-sun-synchronous orbit with an altitude of 700 kilometers. Developed by the French space agency, CNES, the Taranis satellite (Tool for the Analysis of RAdiation from lightNIng and Sprites) will be a secondary payload during a mission to deliver multiple spacecraft. The satellite will study magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere coupling via transient processes, focusing in particular on two aspects: determining the characteristics and frequency of transient luminous events (TLE) involved in the coupling between the ionosphere and atmosphere, and characterizing the electron beams accelerated from the atmosphere to the magnetosphere. The contract for the mission between Toulouse Space Center and Arianespace was announced on July 9, 2012. The agreement also included options for the launch of two other CNES satellites, Microscope and Merlin.

Postponed from May 2015: A Proton-M/Block DM-03 rocket to launch a trio of GLONASS-M navigation satellites (No. 51, 52, 53; Block 50) from Baikonur. (Postponed from 2014 and from beginning of 2015.)

Postponed from December 2015: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat rocket to launch the Meteor-M No. 2-1 remote-sensing satellite, along with a cluster of secondary payloads, including Ionosfera-1, Ionosfera-2, Flying Laptop, Flock 2, Scout, AISSat-3, Perseus-O1, Perseus-O2.

Postponed from 2015: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch a Pion-NKS electronic intelligence satellite from Plesetsk. (As of 2014)

Postponed from 2015: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch a cluster of Globalstar satelllites from Baikonur. (As of March 2013)

Postponed from 2015: Soyuz rocket to launch the Foton-M No. 5 spacecraft. The spacecraft is expected to be equipped with solar panels, modified service module, and the new liquid-propellant orbit correction engine. The orbital lifespan of the satellite to be launched into the 400-450-kilometer orbit was expected to increase to 60 days. (As of April 2009)

Postponed from around 2015: Russia to launch Kosmos-SKh satellite to monitor agricultural development from space.

Postponed from 2015: A Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat rocket to launch a GLONASS-K2 satellite from Plesetsk.

Postponed from 2015: Russia to launch the Kartograf-OE No. 2 remote-sensing satellite.

Postponed from end of 2015: Russia to launch Elektro-VO No. 1 satellite. (As of 2012.)

Postponed from 2015: A Rockot booster to make three flights with military payloads from Pad 3 at Site 133 in Plesetsk. (As of middle of 2014)

Delayed from fourth quarter of 2014: A Zenit-3SLB/Fregat-SB to launch a Ukrainian Lybid satellite from Baikonur. (As of April 2012. When first announced in 2006, the mission was promised to take place in 2010 and was later expected in September 2011. In April 2010, the launch was promised in April 2012. It was then delayed to the fourth quarter of 2013. In August 2014, Ukrainian space agency said that the spacecraft would be ready for launch in the fourth quater of that year).

Uncertain dates

Beginning of 2016: Russia to launch Elektro-VO No. 2 satellite. (As of 2012)


Canceled missions

April: A Dnepr booster to launch a pair of Iridium NEXT satellites from Silo facility No. 370/11 in Dombarovsky. (The mission was postponed from June 2015.)

2015: Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat-SB rocket to launch the Arkon-2M No. 1 remote-sensing satellites for all-weather radar observations of the Earth surface from a 550-600-kilometer Sun-synchronous orbit. The launch was originally promised in 2009 (299) and later in 2012-2013. In 2010, a pair of spacecraft was scheduled for launch in 2013, however by 2012, the first Arkon-2M was expected to fly in 2015 and the second in 2016. The Arkon-2M program was canceled by November 2012 to free funds for Arktika, Resurs and Obzor projects.

2014-2015: Russia to launch a solar telescope -- Koronas-4-Monitor -- to replace a failed Koronas-Foton spacecraft. (A February 2010 proposal from Astrophysics Institute at the National Nuclear Research University.) By the end of March 2010, a project to replace Koronas-Foton was identified as Solaris by the Solar System division within Space Council of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The division recommended Lebedev Physics Institute, FIAN, as a main developer of the satellite's payload. The issue of the spacecraft bus remained open at the time, with NPO Lavochkin's yet-to-be-flown Navigator platform as one of the contenders. Unlike Koronas-Foton, the new telescope was expected to be narrowly specialized in solar observations and it was to be inserted into very high orbit to minimize the shadow from Earth and the influence of the planet's radiation belt. As of April 2010, the project was yet to be approved for the inclusion into the Russian space program or to receive any funding.

2015: Russia to launch MKA FKI No. 5 ARKA orbital solar observatory. (Canceled in March 2014)

A Soyuz-2.1b rocket to launch the Arktika-R No. 1 satellite into the polar orbit for radar observations of the polar areas. Originally a pair of Arktika-R satellites was planned for launch in 2014, by the end of 2010, the introduction of the system slipped to 2015. (442) By 2012, the second Arktika-R satellite was postponed to 2016.

2016: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat-M to launch GLONASS-K1 No. 13 (Block K3s) navigation satellite from Plesetsk.

2016: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat-M to launch GLONASS-K1 No. 14 (Block K4s) navigation satellite from Plesetsk.

2016: A Rockot or Soyuz-2-1v to launch a trio of Gonets-M communications satellites from Plesetsk.

2016: A Proton-M/DM-03 rocket to launch the Ekspress-AMU-2 communications satellite from Baikonur.

2016: A Rockot booster to launch its final military payload from Plesetsk.

2016: Russia to launch Resurs-PM No. 1 remote-sensing satellite. (As of 2009, two Resurs-PM satellites were promised in 2015 and 2016 (388). However during 2010-2012, official plans listed a single Resurs-PM launch in 2016.)

2016: Russia to launch the Resurs-PM No. 2 remote-sensing satellite. (As of 2009 388)

2016: A Soyuz-2.1b rocket to launch the Arktika-R No. 2 satellite into the polar orbit for radar observations of the polar areas.

2016: Angara-1.2 to fly its first test mission from Plesetsk

2016: Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat-SB rocket to launch the Arkon-2M No. 2 remote-sensing satellites for all-weather radar observations of the Earth surface from a 550-600-kilometer Sun-synchronous orbit. In 2010, a pair of spacecraft was scheduled for launch in 2013, however by 2012, the first Arkon-2M was expected to fly in 2015 and the second in 2016. The Arkon-2M program was canceled by November 2012.


For missions in 2017 click here

This page is compiled by Anatoly Zak

Last update: July 19, 2016

All rights reserved

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MEDIA ARCHIVE

away

A Soyuz-2-1b rocket lifts off with the GLONASS-M-51 satellite on Feb. 7, 2016. Click to enlarge. Credit: Russian Ministry of Defense


liftoff

A Proton rocket lifts off with ExoMars-2016 spacecraft on March 14. Click to enlarge. Credit: ESA


ExoMars

A 1-to-4 scale model of the Entry, Descent and Landing Demonstrator Module from the first phase of the ExoMars project launched on March 14. Copyright © 2010 Anatoly Zak


launch

Soyuz MS-01 lifts off on July 7, 2016. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


CSO

As of 2011, the first CSO-1 (Composante Spatiale Optique) satellite was expected to fly on a Soyuz rocket in December 2016. Copyright © 2009 Anatoly Zak


Meteor-M No. 3

The Meteor-M No. 3 spacecraft was expected to feature a drastically different design from its predecessors in a series. Click to enlarge. Credit: VNIIEM


pion

As of 2014, a Pion-NKS spacecraft for radar and radio surveillance was promised to enter orbit in 2015. Credit: Arsenal


blagovest

Blagovest military communications satellite. Credit: ISS Reshetnev