TwitterpinterestFacebook










vostochny1


flight4


Gonets-M1


 

Russian space program in 2024

At the end of January 2024, Deputy Defense Minister Aleksei Krivoruchko promised 18 orbital launches of military spacecraft before the end of the year. Seven launches of intercontinental ballistic missiles were also planned for 2024. In total more than 40 orbital launches were planned by Roskosmos, according to an interview of its head Yuri Borisov published on February 19. However, Borisov cautioned that it was only a plan which would be difficult to fulfill given the experience in the previous year.

For missions in 2023 click here


 

The world's orbital launch attempts in 2024 (as of February 29, 2024 ):

Country
Launch date
Time of launch
Payload
Payload type
Launch vehicle
Launch site
Launch complex
Launch pad
Status
1 India Jan. 1 09:10 India Standard Time X-Ray Polarimeter Satellite (XPoSat) Science / astronomy PSLV-C58 Sriharikota FLP 1
Success
2 USA Jan. 2 7:44 p.m. Pacific Time Starlink-7-9 (21 satellites) Application / Internet Falcon-9 Vandenberg SLC-4E E
Success
3 USA Jan. 3 6:04 p.m. EST Ovzon-3 Application / communications Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral SLC-40 -
Success
4 China Jan. 5 19:20 Beijing Time Tianmu-1-15, Tianmu-1-16, Tianmu-1-17, Tianmu-1-18, Application / weather forecasting Kuaizhou-1A Jiuquan 43/95A -
Success
5 USA Jan. 7 5:35 p.m. EST Starlink-6-35 (23 satellites) Application / Internet Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral SLC-40 -
Success
6 USA Jan. 8 2:18:38.231 a.m. EST Peregrine Planetary / lunar lander Vulcan-Centaur Cape Canaveral SLC-41 -
Success
7 China Jan. 9 15:03 Beijing Time Einstein Science / X-ray astronomy Chang Zheng-2C Xichang 3 -
Success
8 China Jan. 11 11:52 Beijing Time Tyansin-1-02 Communications Kuaizhou-1A Jiuquan 43/95A -
Success
9 China Jan. 11 13:30 Beijing Time Yunyao-1-18, Yunyao-1-19, Yunyao-1-20 Application / weather forecasting Yinli-1 Yellow Sea Dong Fang Hang Tian barge -
Success
10 Japan Jan. 12 13:44:26 Japan Standard Time IGS Optical-8 Military / optical reconnaissance H-2A/202 (F48) Tanegashima - -
Success
11 USA Jan. 14 12:59:30 a.m. Pacific Time Starlink-7-10 (22 satellites) Application / Internet Falcon-9 Vandenberg SLC-4E E
Success
12 USA Jan. 14 8:52 p.m. EST Starlink-6-73 (23 satellites) Application / Internet Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral SLC-40 -
Success
13 China Jan. 17 22:27:30.728 Beijing Time Tianzhou-7 Cargo supply Chang Zheng-7 Y8 Wenchang 201 -
Success
14 USA Jan. 18 4:49 p.m. EST Crew Dragon Ax-3 Piloted Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral/KSC LC-39A A
Success
15 Iran Jan. 20 06:28:34 UTC Suraya Military Qaem-100 Shahroud - -
Success
16 China Jan. 23 12:03 Beijing Time Taijing-1-03, -2-02, 2-03, -2-04, -4-03 Application / remote-sensing Lijian-1 (Kinetica-1) (Y3) Jiuquan 130 -
Success
17 USA Jan. 23 4:35:00 p.m. Pacific Time Starlink-7-11 (22 satellites) Application / Internet Falcon-9 Vandenberg SLC-4E E
Success
18 Iran Jan. 28   Mahda, Kayhan-2, Hatef-1   Simorgh Semnan - -
Success
19 USA Jan. 28 8:10:00 p.m. EST Starlink-6-38 (23 satellites) Application / Internet Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral/KSC LC-39 -
Success
20 USA Jan. 28 9:57 p.m. Pacific Time Starlink-7-12 (22 satellites) Application / Internet Falcon-9 Vandenberg SLC-4E E
Success
21 USA Jan. 30 12:07 p.m. EST Cygnus NG-20 Cargo supply Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral SLC-40 -
Success
22 USA Jan. 31 19:34 New Zealand Time Lemur (4 satellites) Application Electron Mahia LC-1B B
Success
23 China Feb. 3 07:37 Beijing Time Geely-02 (11 satellites) Navigation Chang Zheng-2C Xichang - -
Success
24 China Feb. 3 11:06 Beijing Time DRO-L, Zhixing-2A (SmartSat-2A), DongFangHuiYan-GF01, WeiHai-1/01, -02, XingShiDai-18, -19, -20, NexSat-1 Experimental Jielong-3 (Smart Dragon) (Y3) Yangjian, Guangdong, South-China Sea Bo Run Jiu Zhou barge -
Success
25 USA Feb. 8 1:33 a.m. EST PACE Application / remote sensing Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral SLC-40 -
Success
26 Russia (IC) Feb. 9 10:03 Moscow Time Kosmos-2575 Military Soyuz-2-1v Plesetsk Site 43 4
Success
27 USA Feb. 9 4:34 p.m. Pacific Time Starlink-7-13 (22 satellites) Application / Internet Falcon-9 Vandenberg SLC-4E E
Success
28 USA Feb. 14 5:30 p.m. EST USSF-124 (6 satellites) Military / easrly warning Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral SLC-40 -
Success
29 Russia (IC) Feb. 15 06:25:05.527 Moscow Time Progress MS-26 Cargo supply Soyuz-2-1a Baikonur Site 31 6
Success
30 USA Feb. 15 1:05 a.m. EST Intuitive Machines' (IM1) Odysseus Nova-C Moon / lander Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral/KSC LC-39A A
Success
31 USA Feb. 15 1:34 p.m. Pacific Time Starlink-7-14 (22 satellites) Application / Internet Falcon-9 Vandenberg SLC-4E E
Success
32 Japan Feb. 17 09:39 Japan Standard Time CE-Sat-1E, TirSat-3U Experimental H3 (TF2) Tanegashima - -
Success
33 India Feb. 17 17:35 India Standard Time Insat-3DS Application GSLV-Mk2 (F14) Sriharikota SLP 2
Success
34 USA Feb. 19 06:52 New Zeland Time ADRAS-J Experimental / inspector Electron-KS (F44) Mahia LC-1A A
Success
35 USA Feb. 20 3:11 p.m. EST Telkomsat Merah Putih-2 Application / communications Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral SLC-40 -
Success
36 USA Feb. 22 8:11:50 p.m. Pacific Time Starlink-7-15 (22 satellites) Application / Internet Falcon-9 Vandenberg SLC-4E E
Success
37 China Feb. 23 ~19:30 Beijing Time Tongxin Jishu Shiyan Weixing (TJSW-11) Military Chang Zheng-5 (Y7) Wenchang 101 -
Success
38 USA Feb. 25 5:06 p.m. EST Starlink-6-39 (24 satellites) Appllication / Internet Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral - -
Success
39 Russia (IC) Feb. 29 08:43:26 Moscow Time Meteor-M2-4, Marafon-IoT mass mockup (IC), Zorky-2M No. 2, Pars-1, SITRO-AIS-13 — 28 (16 satellites) Application / weather forecasting Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat Vostochny 1S  
Success
40 China Feb. 29 21:03 Bejing Time Hulianwang gaogui weixing 01 xing Application / communications Cang Zheng-3B Xichang    
In progress
41 USA Feb. 29 10:30 a.m. EST Starlink-6-40 (23 satellites) Application / Internet Falcon-9 Cape Canaveral SLC-40  
Success

 

 

The 2024 space launch score card (as of February 29, 2024 ):

USA
China
Iran
Japan
India
World
Launch vehicles
Falcon-9:
19
Kuaizhou-1A:
2
Qaem-100:
1
H2A:
1
PSLV:
1
 
Vulcan-Centaur:
1
Chang Zheng-2C:
2
Simorgh:
1
H3:
1
GSLV-Mk2:
1
Electron:
2
Yinli:
1
     
 
Chang Zheng-7:
1
 
     
 
Lijian-1 (Kinetica-1):
1
         
 
Jielong-3 (Smart Dragon)
:
1
         
 
Chang Zheng-5:
1
         
 
Chang Zheng-3B:
1
         
USA total:
22
China total:
10
Russia total:
3
Iran total:
2
Japan total:
2
India total:
2
World total:
41
USA failed:
0
China failed:
0
Russia failed:
0
Iran failed:
0
India failed:
0
Japan failed:
0
World failed:
0
Launch sites
Vandenberg:
7
Jiuquan:
3
Shahroud:
1
Tanegashima:
2
Sriharikota:
2
World sites:
15
Cape Canaveral:
13
Xichang:
3
Semnan:
1
 
 
Mahia:
2
Yellow Sea:
1
       
 
Wenchang:
2
         
 
South-China Sea:
1
         

 

Planned Russian space launches in 2024:

March 21, 17:21 Moscow Time: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the Soyuz MS-25 (No. 756) spacecraft with a crew of three from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS.

As of 2014, the first launch of a Soyuz crew vehicle to the ISS was penciled for March 30, 2024, but by during much of 2023, the Soyuz MS-25 mission was expected to lift off on March 13, 2024. However by the end of 2023, the launch was re-scheduled for March 21, 2024, reportedly not to coincide with "elections" in Russia.

Originally, Russian cosmonauts Aleksei Ovchinin and Oleg Platonov were to be joined by a visiting crew member from Belarus. As of May 2023, Belarussian authorities were expected to appoint a flight attendant from the Belavia airline Marina Vasilevskaya as the primary candidate and a pediatric doctor Anastasiya Lenkova as her backup. Vasilevskaya and Lenkova arrived to Star City to begin their eight-month training for the flight on July 23, 2023. By that time, Vasilevskaya was expected to make a 12-day visit to the ISS, accompanied by Roskosmos cosmonaut Oleg Novitsky and NASA astronaut Tracy Dyson. Vasilevskaya and Novitsky were slated to land aboard the returning Soyuz MS-24 spacecraft, as members of Visiting Crew No. 21, along with NASA astronaut Loral O'Hara, completing a long-duration stay on the ISS. In the meantime, Dyson would remain aboard the ISS for a multi-month shift on the station. The Soyuz MS-25 backup crew included Roskosmos cosmonaut Ivan Vagner and NASA astronaut Donald Pettit.

On Aug. 15, 2023, the Chief Medical Commission at the Cosmonaut Training Center recommended the removal of Oleg Platonov from the backup crew of Soyuz MS-24 and Expeditions 70 and 71. As a result, Aleksei Ovchinin was left as a backup to both Russian members of the Soyuz MS-24 crew.

The Soyuz-2-1a rocket for the mission arrived at Baikonur and delivered to vehicle assembly building at Site 112 on Sept. 11, 2023. Then, Soyuz MS-25 was delivered to the launch site from RKK Energia, along with the Progress MS-27 cargo ship, on Sept. 14, 2023.

After a period in a storage mode since the second half of December 2023, the prepaprations resumed on January 11, 2024 with test activation of onboard equipment followed by a series of integrated electric tests. On January 25, Roskosmos announced the return of the spacecraft from the anechoic chamber at Site 254 after testing of radio equipment in the ship's Kurs-NA rendezvous system.

From Feb. 7 to Feb. 13, 2024, Soyuz MS-25 was transported into the vacuum chamber at Site 254 for air leak checks. The tests continued until February 13, when the spacecraft was returned back to its work site for testing of the propulsion (INSIDER CONTENT) and descent control systems, followed by onboard flight control computer, radio system tests. Also, the ship's thermal control system (INSIDER CONTENT) would be filled with coolant.

On Feb. 19, 2024, the Emergency Escape System, SAS, for the Soyuz MS-25 mission was delivered to the launch site and on February 27, the ship's solar panels were put to a routine test.


March 30: A Soyuz-2-1b rocket to launch the Resurs-P No. 4 satellite from Site 31 in Baikonur. (As of September 2023, the launch was expected in mid-November 2023, but by that time, it had slipped into 2024. In early 2024, the launch was expected on March 30, 2024.)


April 5-15: An Angara-5 rocket to fly its first mission (INSIDER CONTENT) from its new launch pad in Vostochny.


May 21: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat rocket to launch a pair of Ionosfera-M satellites and a cluster of secondary payloads from Pad 1S in Vostochny. The launch was planned for Dec. 5, 2023, but in September 2023, it was pushed back until Dec. 10, 2023, at 02:18 Moscow Time, and to Dec 12, 2023. By November 2023, the mission was postponed until May 2024.


June 3: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch Progress MS-27 from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014) Progress MS-27 was delivered to Baikonur, along with Soyuz MS-25, on Sept. 14, 2023. By November 2023, the launch was re-scheduled from April 16, 2024, to May 30, 2024, and in early January 2024, it was expected on June 3, 2024.


June 8: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch Kondor-FKA No. 2 satellite from Pad 1S in Vostochny. (As of March 2023)


Second quarter of 2024: A Soyuz-2.1a rocket to launch the Obzor-R remote-sensing satellite. In early 2024, the launch was expected in the second quarter of that year.


July: Russia to launch Elektro-M No. 2-2 weather-forecasting satellite.


August 15: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch Progress MS-28 from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014, the launch was panciled for July 1, but by the Fall of 2023, the launch drifted to Aug. 15, 2024.

The delivery of the spacecraft to Baikonur was reported on Nov. 29, 2023.


August: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the Bion-M No. 2 satellite. (In 2013, the launch was expected in 2016-2017, however by mid-2014 it was delayed to 2019. In 2015, the mission was re-scheduled for 2021 and by the end of 2018, it was postponed until 2023. The 2023 launch date was reconfirmed in 2019. By that time, it was postponed until 2024.)


September 11: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch a Soyuz MS-26 (Production No. 757) with a crew of three from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014)

In March 2023, Roskosmos reported that Sergei Kud-Sverchkov, Aleksei Zubritsky and Aleksandr Gorbunov were assigned to be a backup crew for Expedition 72, which included Sergei Ryzhikov and Mikaev. Kud-Sverchkov's crew was also expected to serve as a primary crew during the first Russian expedition to the ISS in 2025.

After post-production tests in Korolev in the Fall of 2023, Soyuz MS-26 was shipped to Baikonur Cosmodrome on Dec. 18, 2023. It was unloaded at the processing site at Site 254 in Baikonur on Dec. 25, 2023.


October 16: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch Progress cargo ship from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014)

 

For missions in 2025 click here

insider content


This page is compiled by Anatoly Zak

Last update: February 29, 2024

All rights reserved

 

insider content

 

Bion-M

Scale model of the Bion-M satellite. Copyright © 2010 Anatoly Zak