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Luna-Grunt in 2020













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Venera-D in 2021


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Russian space program in 2021

On February 20, Head of Roskosmos Dmitry Rogozin paid a visit to the Kremlin for a report to the president on the year-end status of the Russian space sector. In a public transcript of his exchange with Vladimir Putin, Rogozin said that 29 space launches had been planned for 2021, including missions postponed from the previous year, referring primarily to the OneWeb Internet satellites, but also to the long-delayed launch of the Luna-25 lander and the Obzor-R radar-carrying satellite. Two modules for the Russian Segment of the International Space Station, ISS, (Nauka and Prichal) were also promised to fly. Finally, one Angara-5 and two Angara-1.2 launchers were scheduled to continue flight testing of the new rocket family. According to Rogozin, the Russian civilian satellite constellation included 89 spacecraft at the time.

For missions in 2020 click here

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A Soyuz-2-1b rocket lifts off on February 2, 2021.

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The world's orbital launch attempts in 2021 (as of July 23, 2021 ):

Country
Launch date
Time of launch
Payload
Payload type
Launch vehicle
Launch site
Launch complex
Launch pad
Status
1
USA
Jan. 7
9:15 p.m. EST
Turksat-5A
Application / communications
Falcon-9 (104, B1060.4)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
2
USA
Jan. 17
10:38 a.m. PST
10 ELaNa CubeSats: CACTUS-1, ExoCube-12, MiTEE, CoSGC, PolarCube, Cu-PACE, TechEdSat-7, CAPE-3, RadExSat-2, PICS-1, -2
Experimental
LauncherOne Rocket 3/Boeing-747 Cosmic Girl
Mojave
-
-
Success
3
China
Jan. 20
00:25 Beijing Time
Tiangong-1-03
Application / communications
Chang Zheng-3/G2
Xichang
2
-
Success
4
USA
Jan. 20
07:26 UTC
GMS-T
-
Electron
Mahia
LC1
-
Success
5
USA
Jan. 20
8:02 a.m. EST
Starlink Flight 17 (956-1,014) (60)
Application / communications
Falcon-9-105 (B1051.8 S)
Cape Canaveral (KSC)
39A
A
Success
6
USA
Jan. 24
10:00 a.m. EST
Transporter-1: Starlink (x10), ASELSAT, Capella-3 (Whitney-1), Capella-4 (Whitney-2), Charlie, PIXL-1 (CubeL, OSIRIS4Cubesat), Flock-4s (x40), GHGSat-C2 (Hugo), ICEYE-X8, -X9, -X10, IDEASSat, ION-SVC 2 (ION-SVC Laurentius, PULSE) [Flock-4s (x8), SpaceBEE (x12)], Kepler (x8), Landmapper-Demo-6, -7, Lemur-2 (x8), Prometheus-2.10 (P2-10), ELaNa-35: PTD-1, QPS-SAR-2 Izanami (IQPS-2), ADELIS-SAMSON-1, -2, -3, SOMP-2b, SpaceBEE (x24), SXRS-3 / Sherpa-FX 1 [ARCE-1A, ARCE-1B, ARCE-1C, Astrocast (x5), Hawk-2A, -2B, -2C, hosted payloads: Celestis-17, ELROI, EyeStar-Tag], UVSQ-SAT, V-R3X (x3), XR-1, YUSAT
Application
Falcon-9 (106-B1063.2S)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
7
China
Jan. 29
12:47 Beijing Time
Yaogan Weixing-31 Group-2
Military
Chang Zheng-4C (Y31)
Jiuquan
43/94
-
Success
8
China
Feb. 1
16:15 Beijing Time
Fangzhou-2
Experimental
Shuang Quxian-1 (Y2)
Jiuquan
43/95
-
Failure
9
Russia
Feb. 2
23:45:28.079 Moscow Time
Military / electronic intelligence
4
Success
10
USA
Feb. 4
1:19 a.m. EST
Starlink Flight 18 (60 sats: 1,014-1,074)
Application / communications
Falcon-9-107 v1.2 (Block 5)
Cape Canaveral
LC-40
-
Success
11
China
Feb. 4
23:36:04.286 Beijing Time
TJSW-6
Military
Chang Zheng-3B/G3 Y77
Xichang
3
-
Success
12
Russia
Feb. 15
07:45:06.310 Moscow Time
Piloted / cargo supply
6
Success
13
USA
Feb. 15
10:59 p.m. EST
Starlink Flight 19 (60 satellites)
Application / communications
Falcon-9 v1.2 Block 5, Flight 108 (B1059.6 S)
Cape Canaveral
LC-40
-
Success
14
USA
Feb. 20
12:36:54.4 p.m. EST
Cygnus NG-15 (CRS-15, S.S. Kathrine Johnson), ThinSat 2 (x30), DhabiSat (MYSat-2), Gunsmoke-J-2 (Jacob's Ladder-2), IT-Spins, Classified U.S. government payload (x2)
Piloted / cargo supply
Wallops Isl.
-
-
Success
15
China
Feb. 21
10:22 Beijing Time
Yaogan Weixing-31 Group-3 (x3)
Military
Chang Zheng-4C
Jiuquan
-
-
Success
16
India
Feb. 28
10:24 a.m. India Standard Time
Amazonia-1, SindhuNetra, SDSat, NanoConnect-2, UNITYsat-1 - 3, SpaceBEE-76 - 87
Application / remote sensing
PSLV-C51
Sriharikota
-
-
Success
17
Russia
Feb. 28
09:55:01.415 Moscow Time
Application / weather forecasting
6
Success
18
USA
March 4
03:24:54 a.m. EST
Starlink Flight 20 (60 sats)
Application / communications
Falcon-9 (B1049.8)
Cape Canaveral, KSC
39A
A
Success
19
USA
March 11
03:13:29 a.m. EST
Starlink Flight 21 (60 sats)
Application / communications
Falcon-9-110 (B1058.6 S)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
20
China
March 12
01:51 Beijing Time
Shiyan-9
Experimental
Chang Zheng-7A (Y2)
Wenchang
-
-
Success
21
China
March 13
10:19 Beijing Time
Yaogan Weixing-31 Group-4 (x3)
Military
Chang Zheng-4C (Y42)
Jiuquan
43/94
-
Success
22
USA
March 14
6:01 a.m. EDT
Starlink Flight 22 (v1.0 L21) (60 sats)
Application / communications
Falcon-9 (111 - B1051.9 S)
Cape Canaveral, KSC
39A
A
Success
23
Russia
March 22
09:07:12.770 Moscow Time
Application / remote sensing
6
Success
24
USA
March 23
11:30 New Zealand Decree Time
BlackSky-7, Centauri-3, Gunsmoke-J-1 (Jacob's Ladder-1), M2-A, M2-B, Myriota-7, Veery RL1-v0.1
Various
Electron/Photon
Mahia
LC-1A
A
Success
25
USA
March 24
4:28 a.m. EDT
Starlink Flight 23 (60 satellites)
Application / communications
Falcon-9
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
26
Russia
March 25
05:47:33.180 Moscow Time
Application / communications
-
Success
27
China
March 31
06:45 Beijing Time
Gaofen-12 02
Application / remote-sensing
Chang Zheng-4C (Y43)
Jiuquan
-
-
Success
28
USA
April 7
12:34 p.m. EDT
Starlink (60 satellites)
Application / communications
Falcon-9
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
29
China
April 9
07:01 Beijing Time
Shiyan-6-3
Experimental
Chang Zheng-4B (Y49)
Taiyuan
9
-
Success
30
Russia
April 9
10:42:40.496 Moscow Time
6
Success
31
USA
April 23
5:49 a.m. EDT
Crew Dragon (Endeavour)
Piloted
Falcon-9
Cape Canaveral, KSC
39A
A

Success

32
Russia
April 26
01:14:08.194 Moscow Time
Application / communications
-
Success
33
USA
April 26
1:47 p.m. Pacific Time
NROL-82
Military
Delta-4 Heavy
Vandenberg
SLC-6
-
Success
34
China
April 26
11:20 Beijing Time
Qilu-1, Qilu-4, Foshan-1, Zhongan Guotong-1, Tianqi-09, Taijing-2-01, Jinzijing-1, Qiyuan taikong NEO-1
Application
Chang Zheng-6
Taiyuan
16
-
Success
35
Europe
April 28
10:50 p.m. French Guiana Time
Pleiades Neo-3, NorSat-3, Tyvak-182A (Eutelsat ELO alpha)
Military / reconnaissance
-
Success
36
China
April 29
-
Tianhe
Unpiloted / space station module
Chang Zheng-5B (Y2)
Wenchang
-
-
Success
37
USA
April 28
11:44 p.m. EDT
Starlink (60 satellites)
Application / communications
Falcon-9
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
38
China
April 30
15:27 Beijing Time
Yaogan-34
Application / remote-sensing
Chang Zheng-4C
Jiuquan
-
-
Success
39
USA
May 4
2:01 p.m. EDT
Starlink (No. 1,505-1,565)
Application / communications
Falcon-9FT Block 5 (F9-116)
Cape Canaveral, KSC
39A
A
Success
40
China
May 7
02:11 Beijing Time
Yaogan-30 (Group 8: A, B, C), Tianqi-12
Application / remote-sensing
Chang Zheng-2C
Xichang
3
-
Success
41
USA
May 9
2:42 a.m. EDT
Starlink (60 satellites)
Application / communications
Falcon-9 B1051 (10th flight)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
42
USA
May 15
22:11 New Zealand Time
BlackSky Global (Group 20: 2 satellites)
Application / remote-sensing
Electron
Mahia
1
-
Failure
43
USA
May 15
6:56 p.m. EDT
Starlink (Flight 28: 52 satellites), Tyvak-0130, Capella-6 (Capella Whitney-4)
Application / communications
Falcon-9-118 (B1058.8S)
Cape Canaveral, KSC
LC-39A
A

Success

44
USA
May 18
1:37 p.m. EDT
SBIRS Geo-5, TDO-3, TDO-4
Military / early warning
Atlas-5 (421)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-41
-
Success
45
China
May 19
04:03 UTC
Haiyang-2D
Application / remote-sensing
Chang Zheng-4B (Y48)
Jiuquan
43/94
-
Success
46 USA May 26 2:59:35 p.m. EDT Starlink (60 satellites)
Application / communications
Falcon-9-119 (B1063.2)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
47 Russia May 28 20:38:39.549 Moscow Time OneWeb-7 (36 satellites: 183-218) Application / communications Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat Vostochny 1S - Success
48 China May 29 - Tianzhou-2 Unpiloted / cargo supply Chang Zheng-7 (Y3) Wenchang 201 - Success
49 China June 2 - Fengyun-4B Application / weather forecasting Chang Zheng-3B Xichang - - Success
50 USA June 3 1:29 p.m. EDT Cargo Dragon V2 SpX-22 (CRS-22) Unpiloted / cargo supply Falcon-9 (120) (B1067) Cape Canaveral, KSC 39 - Success
51 USA June 6 00:26 EDT Sirius-XM-8 Application / broadcasting Falcon-9 (121) (B1061.3 S) Cape Canaveral SLC-40 - Success
52 China June 11 11:03 Bejing Time Beijing Xilie-3 dai xing, Haisi-2, Yangwang-1, Taikong Shiyan-1 'Tianjian Weixing' Science, Applications Chang Zheng-2D Taiyuan - - Success
53 Iran June 12 ? Tolou-2 (?) Military Simorgh (Safir-2) Semnan 2 - Failure
54 USA June 13 08:11:05 UTC Odyssey (TacRL-2, USA-316) Military Pegasus-XL/L-1011 Stargazer Vandenberg Air-launched - Success
55 USA June 15 9:35 a.m. Eastern Time NROL-111: USA-317, USA-318, USA-319 Military Minotaur-1 Wallops Isl. MARS LP-0B B Success
56 China June 17 09:22 Beijing Time Shenzhou-12 Piloted Chang Zheng-2F (Y12) Jiuquan 43/91 - Success
57 USA June 17 16:09:35 UTC GPS-3 SV05 (Navstar-78, Neil Armstrong) Military / navigation Falcon-9 (122) (B1062.2 S) Cape Canaveral SLC-40 - Success
58 China June 18 06:30 UTC Yaogan-30-09 (1), Yaogan-30-09 (2),
Yaogan-30-09 (2),
Tianqi-14
Military / electronic intelligence Chang Zheng-2C Xichang - - Success
59 Russia June 25 22:50:00 Moscow Time Kosmos-2550 (Pion-NKS No. 901) Military / ELINT Soyuz-2-1b Plesetsk 43 4 Success
60 Russia June 30 02:27:20.324 Moscow Time Progress MS-17 Piloted / cargo supply Soyuz-2-1a
6
Success
61
USA
June 30
14:47 UTC
"Tubular Bells: Part One": HALO-Net Free Flyer, Gunsmoke-J 3, CNCE Block-1 (x2), (STP-27VPA/DIU), BRIK-2, STORK-4, STORK-5 (MARTA)
Experimental
LauncherOne/Boeing-747 Cosmic Girl
Mojave
Runway 12/30
-
Success
62 USA June 30 3:31 p.m. Eastern Time Transporter-2: Starlink (x3) [v1.0 R1], Capella-5 (Whitney-3), Centauri-4, D2/AtlaCom-1, EarthTV-1, EG-3 (Tyvak-0173), GNOMES-2, ICEYE-X11, ICEYE-X12, ICEYE-X13, ION-SCV-003 (Dauntless David, Wild Ride) [NAPA-2 (RTAF-SAT-2), Spartan, Neptuno, W-Cube, Ghalib, QMR-KWT, hosted payload: LaserCube, Nebula, Worldfloods], LINCS-A, LINCS-B, LEMUR-2 (x2), Mandrake-2A, Mandrake-2B, ÑuSat-19-22, SAI-2, Sherpa-FX2 [Astrocast (x5), Hawk-3A, -3B, -3C, LEMUR-2 (x3), Lynk-06 (Shannon), PAINANI-2, SpaceBEE (x12), hosted payload: TagSat-2], Sherpa-LTE1 [ARTHUR-1, Astro Digital Demo-8 (Tenzing, Tanker-001), Astro Digital Demo-9 (Shasta), Faraday Phoenix, KSF-1A (PVM-1A), KSF-1B (PVM-1B), KSF-1C (PVM-1C), KSF-1D (PVM-1D) {KSM-2, Kleos Polar Vigilance Mission}, LEMUR-2, Tiger-2], SpaceBEE (xTBD), TUBIN, Umbra-2001, XR-2, YAM-2, YAM-3 Experimental Falcon-9 (123) (B1060.8 L)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
63 Russia July 1 15:48:33.383 Moscow Time 36 OneWeb (Satellites 219-254) Applications / communications Soyuz 2-1b /Fregat
-
Success
64 China July 3 02:51 UTC Jilin-1 Kuanfu-01B “Neimenggu-1”, Jilin-1 Gaofen-03D 01 "Xueersi" Jilin-1 Gaofen-03D 02, Jilin-1 Gaofen-03D 03, Xingshidai-10 "Guangdong Hengjian" Military Chang Zheng-2D (Y74) Taiyuan 9 - Success
65 China July 4 23:28 UTC Fengyun san hao 05 xing, i.e. FY-3 Satellite-05 Appllication / weather forecasting Chang Zheng-4C Jiuquan 43/94 - Success
66 China July 6 15:55 UTC Tianlian-1 (05) Application / data relay Chang Zheng-3C/G3 (Y18) Xichang 3 - Success
67 China July 9 11:59 UTC Ningxia-1 (Group 2) Application / remote-sensing Chang Zheng-6 (Y6) Taiyuan 16 - Success
68 China July 19 00:19 UTC Yaogan-30 Group-10, Tianqi-15 "Ruijin-1" Military / signal intelligence Chang Zheng-2C (Y49) Xichang 3 -

Success

69 Russia July 21 17:58:24.938 Moscow Time MLM-U Nauka Piloted / space station module Proton-M Baikonur 200 39 Success

 

 

The 2021 space launch score card (as of July 23, 2021 ):

USA
China
Russia
India
Europe
Iran
World
Launch vehicles
Falcon-9:
20
Chang Zheng-3B:
3
PSLV:
1
Vega:
1
Simorgh (Safir-2):
1*
LauncherOne:
2
Chang Zheng-4C:
6
Electron:
3 (1*)
Shuang Quxian-1:
1*
Antares:
1
Chang Zheng-7/7A:
2
 
Delta-4:
1
Chang Zheng-4B:
2
 
Atlas-5:
1
Chang Zheng-6:
2
 
Pegasus-XL:
1
Chang Zheng-5B:
1
 
Minotaur-1:
1
Chang Zheng-2D:
2
 
Chang Zheng-2C:
3
 
Chang Zheng-2F:
1
 
Chang Zheng-3C:
1
 
USA total:
30
China total:
24
Russia total:
12
India total:
1
Europe total:
1
Iran total:
1
World total:
69
USA failed:
1
China failed:
1
Russia failed:
0
India failed:
0
Europe failed:
0
Iran failed:
1
World failed:
3
Launch sites
Cape Canaveral:
21
Xichang:
7
Sriharikota:
1
Semnan:
1
World
launch sites:
15
Mojave:
2
Jiuquan:
9

Baikonur:
6

   
Mahia:
3
Wenchang:
3
   
Wallops Island:
2
Taiyuan:
5
     
 
Vandenberg:
2
       
 

*Failed launch

 

 

Planned Russian orbital launches in 2021:

August 20: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat-M rocket (No. N 15000-050) to launch the ninth OneWeb mission (carrying 34 satellites) from the Site 31 in Baikonur. On May 4, 2021, Roskosmos announced that the integration of the four boosters comprising the first stage of the Soyuz-2 rocket with core booster of its second stage had been completed at the vehicle assembly building at Site 31 by a joint team of Yuzhny branch of the TsENKI infrastructure center and RKTs Progress, the Soyuz rocket developer. At the time, the particular vehicle was in the storage mode, awaiting the start of the launch campaign. On July 9, Roskosmos announced that the launch vehicle for the ninth OneWeb mission had been placed to its processing work site in preparation for the final assembly. By the middle of July, the delay of the satellites' shipment to Baikonur until July 28, required postoponing the launch from early August to August 20.

lv

The integration of the two booster stages for the Soyuz rocket assigned to launch the ninth OneWeb mission was completed on May 4, 2021.


September 9: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat-M rocket to launch the 10th OneWeb mission (carrying 34 satellites) from the Site 31 in Baikonur. (The launch was originally planned for August 26). On July 9, Roskosmos announced that personell of the Yuzhny space center in Baikonur and RKTs Progress completed the integration of the first and second stages of the launch vehicle.


October 5: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft (Production No. 749, ISS mission 65S) from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS.

During the early planning of the ISS flight manifest in 2014, the launch of the Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft was planned for September 13, 2021, however in the provisional schedule prepared by Roskosmos at the end of August 2020, the launch of Soyuz MS-19 was slated for October 5, 2021.

At that time, the spacecraft was expected to carry three Russian cosmonauts: Anton Shkaplerov, Sergei Babkin and Mukhtar Aimakhanov, members of the 66th long-duration expedition to the ISS. (By the end of August 2020, Sergei Korsakov replaced Aimakhanov on the crew.) However, in 2020, Roskosmos and the Channel I of the Russian television also discussed sending an actress to the ISS with Soyuz MS-19 to shoot scenes for a sci-fi movie with a working title Vyzov (which in Russian language has a double meaning similar to English words "challenge" and "doctor's house call.") In October 2020, Channel I promised to start casting for the project. On May 13, 2021, Roskosmos announced that actress Yulia Peresild and film director Klim Shipenko had been recommended to be assigned into the primary crew, while Alena Mordovina and Aleksei Dudin to be their backups. On May 19, Roskosmos officially confirmed the crew with Anton Shkaplerov assigned to be the Soyuz commander and a flight engineer during Expedition 66 on the ISS. Oleg Artemiev was the commander of the backup crew.

Four members of the visiting movie crew were scheduled to begin training in Star City on May 24, Roskosmos announced.

If the August 2020 schedule worked as planned, Soyuz MS-19 would become the first crew vehicle docking to the nadir (Earth-facing) port of the UM Prichal module added to the Russian Segment of the station less than a month earlier. At the time, the Soyuz MS-19 mission was expected to last 174 days and land on March 28, 2022. However, in the November 2020, draft of the ISS flight manifest, the docking destination for the Soyuz MS-19 mission was shifted to the MIM1 Rassvet module. The mission's launch date (October 5) and its docking destination on the Rassvet module was confirmed in the official ISS flight manifest approved by Roskosmos on Feb. 3, 2021. At the time, the mission was expected to last for 174 days, until March 28, 2022.

crew

The primary crew of Soyuz MS-19 spacecraft during training in July 2021, left to right: Yulia Peresild, Anton Shkaplerov and Klim Shipenko.


October: A Soyuz-ST-B/Fregat-MT rocket to launch the 11th OneWeb mission (carrying 34 satellites) from the ELS site in French Guiana.


October 28: A Soyuz rocket to launch a Progress MS-18 cargo ship (Production No. 447, ISS mission 79P) from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS. During the early planning of the ISS flight manifest in 2014, the second Russian cargo mission of 2021 was planned for April 16, 2021, however in the provisional schedule prepared by Roskosmos at the end of August 2020, the launch of Progress MS-18 was planned for August 18. By November 2020, the start of the mission slipped to October 28.

At the time, the vehicle was expected to dock to the aft port of the Zvezda Service Module, SM, and remain in orbit for 334 days, supporting 65th and 66th long-duration expeditions aboard the ISS.


October-November or 2022: A Soyuz-2/Fregat rocket to launch the Luna-Glob (Luna-25) lunar lander from Vostochny.


November 8: A Proton-M/Briz-M rocket to launch the Ekspress-AMU3 and Ekspress-AMU7 communications satellites from Baikonur. (The launch date as of June 2021.)


November 17: A Soyuz rocket to launch a Progress MS-19 cargo ship (Production No. 449, ISS mission 80P) from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS. During the early planning of the ISS flight manifest in 2014, Progress launches were planned for July 1 and October 16, 2021, however in the provisional schedule prepared by Roskosmos at the end of August 2020, the third and final launch of the Russian cargo vehicle to the station in 2021 was planned for November 17.

Progress MS-19 was expected to dock to the zenit (sky-facing) port of the MIM2 Poisk module and continue its mission for 286 days.


November 24: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the UM Prichal module to the International Space Station, ISS.


November 30: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the Meteor-M No. 2-3 remote-sensing satellite and a group of secondary payloads, including four satellites from Moscow State University, MGU, from Vostochny. (As of April 2021. As of second half of 2020, the launch was expected between August and October 2021).


End of November: A Soyuz-ST/Fregat rocket (Mission VS26) to launch a pair of Galileo navigation satellites from the ELS facility near Kourou, French Guiana. (As of April 2020, the mission was planned for December 15, 2020, but was later delayed until early 2021 and by the beginning of 2021, the mission slipped to the middle of the year and later shifted to October 2021. By March 2021, the launch was planned at the end of November of that year.


December 8: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the Soyuz MS-20 spacecraft (Production No. 752, ISS mission 66S) with a crew of three from Site 31 in Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS. By July 2020, a pair of tourists accompanied by one professional cosmonaut was assigned to the 12-day flight, officially designated Visiting Expedition-20. According to a preliminary flight manifest drafted by Roskosmos at the end of August 2020, the Soyuz MS-20 mission was expected to take place from December 8 to December 20, 2021. According to the original plans, the spacecraft was to dock at the nadir (Earth-facing) port of the MIM1 Rassvet module, a part of the ISS' Russian Segment, however by November 2020, its destination on the ISS was switched to the MIM2 Poisk module.

Soyuz MS-20 was scheduled to land with the same crew on December 20, 2021, after eight days in orbit. On May 13, 2021, Roskosmos announced that two space tourists from Japan, Yusaku Maezawa and Yozo Hirano, booked by the US-based Space Adventures company would begin training in Star City for flight aboard Soyuz MS-20. They would be accompanied by the Soyuz commander Aleksandr Misurkin, Roskosmos said. The crew was officially confirmed as Visiting Expedition 20, EP-20, on May 19, 2021. Aleksandr Skvortsov was assigned as a backup commander for the mission.


End of 2021: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch a cluster of small payloads from Vostochny, including the second StriX-β radar imaging demonstration satellite. (As of March 2021)

 

Uncertain dates

2021 July 1: A Soyuz rocket to launch a Progress cargo ship from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014)


2021: A Proton-M/Block DM-03 rocket to launch Elektro-L No. 4 satellite from Baikonur. (As of 2019)


Delayed from 2020: An Angara-1.2 rocket to launch the South-Korean Kompsat-6 remote-sensing satellite from Site 35 in Plesetsk. The agreement for the launch in 2020 was announced in July 2016.


2021: A Soyuz-2-1a rocket to launch the second Kondor-FKA radar-carrying satellite. (As of 2019. Postponed from 2019, switched from Rockot/Briz-KM)


Around or after 2021: Russian military to launch the first new-generation Sfera-V military communications satellite. (As of 2016)


2021: A Soyuz-2/Fregat rocket to launch the Luna-Glob-2 (orbiter) toward the Moon.


2021: A Soyuz-5 launch vehicle to fly its first test mission (As of mid-2014).


 

Cancelled missions

2021: Russia to launch the Ekspress-AT4 communications satellite (as of 2014).


2021: Russia to launch the Ekspress-AT5 communications satellite (as of 2014).


2021: Russia to launch the Ekspress-AMU8 communications satellite (as of 2014).


 

This page is compiled by Anatoly Zak

Last update: July 23, 2021

All rights reserved

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vacuum

Soyuz-2-1a rocket lifts off with the Progress MS-16 cargo ship on Feb. 15, 2021. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


vacuum

Soyuz-2-1b with Arktika-M1 satellite lifts off on Feb. 28, 2021. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


vacuum

Soyuz-2-1a lifts off from Baikonur on March 22, 2021, with CAS-500-1 and 38 secondary payloads. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


vacuum

Soyuz MS-18 lifts off on April 9, 2021. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


FGB-2

The FGB-2/MLM module for the Russian segment of the International Space Station, ISS. Copyright © 2001 Anatoly Zak


vacuum

A Proton rocket with the MLM nauka module shortly after arriving at the launch pad on July 17, 2021. Click to enlarge. Credit: Roskosmos


 

docking

As of August 2020, the launch of the UM Prichal module was planned for September 6, 2021. Click to enlarge. Credit: RKK Energia