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Russian space program in 2022

As in 2021, the bulk of Russian launches in 2022 would be for the OneWeb Internet constellation. A total of seven launches were planned to carry OneWeb satellites, including one from French Guiana. The second largest share of launches would be in support of the ISS project. Both sides of the program would rely on the Soyuz-2 series. In the meantime, Col. General Sergei Karakaev, the commander of the Russian Strategic Missile Forces, promised 10 launches of ICBMs during 2022.

For missions in 2021 click here

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The world's orbital launch attempts in 2022 (as of January 22, 2022 ):

Country
Launch date
Time of launch
Payload
Payload type
Launch vehicle
Launch site
Launch complex
Launch pad
Status
1
USA
Jan. 6
4:49:10 p.m. EST
Starlink group 4-5 (49 satellites) flight 34 (v1.5 L5)
Application / communications
Falcon-9 (135, S)
Cape Canaveral, KSC
LC-39A
A
Success
2
USA
Jan. 13
10:25 a.m. EST

Transporter-3 (105 satellites): Alba Cluster 3 (Delfi-PQ, EASAT-2, GRIZU-263a, Hades, Sattla-2A, Sattla-2B, UNICORN-1, UNICORN-2A, UNICORN-2D, UNICORN-2E, UNICORN-2TA1), Alba Cluster-4 (Challenger, FOSSASAT-2E1, 2E2, 2E3, 2E4, 2E5, -2E6, MDQUBESAT-1, PION-BR1, WISESAT-2), BRO-5, Capella-7 (Capella Whitney-5), Capella-8 (Capella Whitney-6), DEWA-SAT-1, ETV-A1, Gossamer Piccolomini, HYPSO-1, ICEYE (x2), ION-SCV 004 Elysian Eleonora [Dodona (La Jument-3U), LabSat, STORK-1, STORK-2,  SW1FT, VZLUSAT-2], IRIS-A, Kepler-16, -17, -18, -19, LEMUR-2, LEMUR-2 DJIRANG, LEMUR-2 MIRIWARI, LAIKA, MDASat-1a, MDASat-1b, MDASat-1c, NuX-1, Ororatech, PILOT-1, SANOSAT-1, Sherpa FX3, Sich 2-30, SuperDove (x44), Tevel-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, -7, -8, UMBRA-02

Application
Falcon-9 Block 5
Cape Canaveral
SLC-40
-
Success
3
USA
Jan. 13
2:51:39 p.m. PST

STP-27VPB payload (7 cubesats): PAN-A/B,
TechEdSat-13 (TES13), GEARRS-3,
ADLER-1, Ignis
SteamSat-2,
STORK-3

Experimental
LauncherOne, Boeing-747 Cosmic Girl
Mojave
Runway 12/30
-
Success
4
China
Jan. 17
10:35 Beijing Time
Shiyan-13
Military
Chang Zheng-2D (Y70)
Taiyuan
9
-
Success
5
USA
Jan. 18
9:02:40 p.m. EST
Starlink Group 4-6 (49 satellites)
Application / communications
Falcon-9 (B1060)
Cape Canaveral, KSC
39A
A
Success
6
USA
Jan. 21
2:00:00 p.m. EST
GSSAP-5, GSAAP-6
Military / situational awarness
Atlas-5 (511, AV-084)
Cape Canaveral
SLC-41
-
Success

 

The 2022 space launch score card (as of January 22, 2022 ):

USA
China
World
Launch vehicles
Falcon-9:
3
Chang Zheng-2D:
1
LauncherOne:
1
 
Atlas-5:
1
 
USA total:
5
China total:
1
World total:
6
USA failed:
0
China failed:
0
World failed:
0
Launch sites
Cape Canaveral:
4
Taiyuan:
1
World:
3
Mojave:
1

 

Planned Russian space missions in 2022:

February 10: A Soyuz ST-B/Fregat-M rocket to launch a cluster of 34 OneWeb satellites from ELS site in French Guiana.

The launch was previously planned for January 6, but was delayed intil February 10. The fueling of the Fregat upper stage for the mission started in French Guiana on January 15 by a team of TsENKI specialists and on January 20, another group from RKTs Progress was due at the center to start processing of the Soyuz-ST rocket.

A transport plane with OneWeb satellites for the mission landed at the airport in Cayenne, French Guiana on Jan. 14, 2022.


February 15, 07:25 Moscow Time: A Soyuz-2-1a rocket to launch a Progress MS-19 cargo ship (Production No. 449, ISS mission 80P) from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. Progress MS-19 was expected to dock to the zenit (sky-facing) port of the MIM2 Poisk module two days after the launch and continue its mission for 286 days. The launch was later scheduled for February 15 and by early 2022, its mission was expected to last 370 days.

On Dec. 1, 2021, the spacecraft was placed into the anechoic chamber within the processing facility at Site 254 in Baikonur for tests of its radio systems. On Dec. 15, 2021, Progress MS-19 was moved to the vacuum chamber at Hall 103 for air leak checks.

In early January 2022, all activities in Baikonur were interrupted by spontaneous anti-government protests across Kazakhstan which quickly escalated into violence and mass arrests.

On January 12, Roskosmos announced that an RKK Energia team had arrived at Baikonur for completing the preparations of the Progress MS-19 cargo ship. The State Corporation also said that all the launch campaigns for vehicles scheduled to fly to the ISS in 2022 had been resuming after the holidays.

On January 17, Roskosmos said that specialists had started loading of the Rodnik water-supply tanks aboard the spacecraft and the processing of dry items for packing inside the ship's cargo compartment. The next day, Roskosmos reported the unloading of the rocket stages for the mission from their rail cars and the inspection of hardware ahead of the integration of the 1A and 2A sections forming the core stage of the Soyuz-2-1a rocket.

vacuum

Progress MS-19 is loaded into vacuum testing facility on Dec. 15, 2021.


March 5: A Soyuz-2-1b/Fregat-M rocket to launch the 13th OneWeb mission from Site 31 in Baikonur. On January 3, Roskosmos announced that the first OneWeb launch of 2022 was postoponed from January 27 until March 5 due to a request from the customer. At the time, a total of seven OneWeb launches were planned during 2022, including six from Baikonur and one from ELS site in French Guiana.

As of early January, the launch campaign for the mission was scheduled to begin on January 26 with the processing of the Fregat upper stage, which had been previously delivered to Baikonur. The arrival of the satellites for the mission from the manufacturing plant was scheduled for February 10.


March 18, 18:55 Moscow Time: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the Soyuz MS-21 spacecraft (No. 750, ISS mission 66S) with a crew of three from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS. The mission was originally assigned to dock at the MIM1 Rassvet module, a part of the station's Russian Segment. The docking destination was later changed to the Prichal Node Module, UM.

The launch was previously planned for March 30, but in the provisional flight manifest prepared by Roskosmos by the end of Summer 2020, the launch of Soyuz MS-21 was advanced to March 18, 2022.

As of Fall of 2020, the mission was to mark the first flight of a US astronaut aboard Soyuz within a barter agreement between NASA and Roskosmos aimed to ensure presence of crew members from the two sides trained to operate the US and Russian segments of the station during long-duration expeditions. However, in the absence of the agreement between NASA and Roskosmos in 2021, Russian cosmonauts Oleg Artemiev, Denis Matveev and Sergei Korsakov were training for the mission. On May 19, 2021, Roskosmos officially confirmed that crew as part of Expedition 67. Sergei Prokopiev, Anna Kikina and Dmitry Petelin were assigned to be backups.

On Jan. 2, 2022, Roskosmos confirmed the launch of Soyuz MS-21 on March 18, 2022, however, the liftoff time shifted to 18:55 Moscow Time from 18:03 Moscow Time previously scheduled for the mission. At the time, Soyuz MS-21 was set to dock at the nadir port of the Prichal Node Module after a two-orbit autonomous flight and remain at the station for 195 days.


Early 2022: Russia to launch the Meteor-M No. 2-4 meteorological satellite. (As of beginning of 2018, the mission was promised in 2021. The mission was previously planned in May 2020).


Second quarter: A Soyuz-ST rocket to launch a pair of European Galileo navigation satellites from the ELS facility in French Guiana. The payload was shifted from the Ariane-6 rocket due to delays with the introduction of the new launch vehicle.


June 3, 12:23 Moscow Time: A Soyuz rocket to launch a Progress MS-20 cargo ship from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014) The spacecraft was shipped from RKK Energia's test facility in Korolev to Baikonur on June 24, 2021. In a preliminary ISS flight manifest issued in 2014, second cargo mission of 2022 was penciled for April 16, but in early January 2022, Roskosmos announced the plan to launch Progress MS-20 on June 3. At the time, its mission was expected to last 173 days.

On Jan. 20, 2022, Roskosmos announced that a Soyuz-2-1a rocket for the future Progress mission had been shipped to Baikonur from RKTs Progress factory in Samara.

iss


September: A Soyuz rocket to launch a Progress MS-21 cargo ship from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014, the launch was planned for July 1). The spacecraft arrived at Baikonur by rail on Oct. 25, 2021.


September 20, 14:10 UTC: A Proton-M rocket with a Briz-M stage to launch the ExoMars rover from Baikonur. In case of on-time launch, the spacecraft was scheduled to land on Mars on June 10, 2023 at 15:32 UTC. The launch window open until October 1, 2022. (As of September 2020. There were earlier reports expecting the launch in August 2022.)


September 21, 16:54 Moscow Time: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the Soyuz MS-22 spacecraft with a crew of three from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS. (As of 2014) As of 2020, Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Anna Kikina were expected to fly the mission. By May 2021, Sergei Prokopiev, Anna Kikina and Dmitri Petelin were listed on the crew, while Kononenko was moved to the next crew. Roskosmos officially confirmed the crew on May 19, 2021. Oleg Kononenko, Nikolai Chub and Andrei Fedyaev were assigned to be backups. However, by December 2021, Kikina was transferred to a US commercial crew (Flight USCV-5) in an exchange program with NASA, so that an American astronaut could fly aboard Soyuz MS-22.

On Jan. 20, 2022, Roskosmos said that US astronaut Frank Rubio would replace Kikina aboard Soyuz MS-22 if the exchange agreement with NASA was reached.

By September 2021, the launch of Soyuz MS-22 was shifted in the ISS flight manifest from September 13 to September 21. The spacecraft was shipped to Baikonur by rail on Dec. 7, 2021, and reached the processing building at Site 254 on Dec. 14, 2021.

On Jan. 2, 2022, Roskosmos confirmed the September 21 launch time and specified the launch time at 16:54 Moscow Time. At the time, the Soyuz MS-22 mission was scheduled to last 188 days.


October 26, 03:19 Moscow Time: A Soyuz rocket to launch a Progress cargo ship from Baikonur toward the International Space Station, ISS. In a preliminary ISS flight manifest drafted in 2014, the third cargo mission of 2022 was penciled for October 16, but in early January 2022, Roskosmos announced the plan to launch Progress MS-21 on October 26. At that time, the vehicle's flight was expected to last 247 days.


October: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the Soyuz MS-23 spacecraft with a crew of three from Baikonur to the International Space Station, ISS.


December: A Soyuz-ST/Fregat rocket to launch Europe's Euclid telescope from Kourou on a mission to map the distribution of galaxies. (As of October 2011, the launch was expected in December 2020. The mission got final approval in June 2012 , then still targeting the launch in 2020. By the end of 2015, the launch was confirmed in December 2020, however by the Fall of 2021, the launch was promised at the end of 2022.


End of 2022: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch a trio of Gonets-M satellites from Vostochny. (As of middle of 2021)


 

Uncertain dates

Postponed from second quarter of 2017: A Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat rocket to launch a GLONASS-K2 satellite from Plesetsk.

Postponed from 2021: A Proton-M/Block DM-03 rocket to launch Elektro-L No. 4 satellite from Baikonur. (As of 2019)

2022: A Proton-M/Block DM-03 rocket to launch Elektro-L No. 5 satellite from Baikonur. (As of 2019)

2022: Russia to launch the Ekspress-AMU7 communications satellite (as of 2014).

2022: A Soyuz rocket to launch the Resurs-P No. 4 remote-sensing satellite. (As of early 2021. As of beginning of 2020, the launch was expected in the first quarter of 2021).

Delayed from November 2020: A Soyuz rocket to launch Resurs-P No. 5 satellite. As of beginning of 2018, the launch was planned in 2019, but by the beginning of that year, it had slipped to November 2020.

Postponed from 2021: Russia to launch the Resurs-PM remote-sensing satellite.

Delayed from 2020: An Angara-1.2 rocket to launch the South-Korean Kompsat-6 remote-sensing satellite from Site 35 in Plesetsk. The agreement for the launch in 2020 was announced in July 2016.


Delayed from 2021: A Soyuz-2-1a rocket to launch the second Kondor-FKA radar-carrying satellite. (As of 2019. Postponed from 2019, switched from Rockot/Briz-KM)


Around or after 2021: Russian military to launch the first new-generation Sfera-V military communications satellite. (As of 2016)


Delayed from 2021: A Soyuz-2/Fregat rocket to launch the Luna-Glob-2 (orbiter) toward the Moon.


October-November or 2022: A Soyuz-2/Fregat rocket to launch the Luna-Glob (Luna-25) lunar lander from Vostochny.


Postponed from November 30: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch the Meteor-M No. 2-3 remote-sensing satellite and a group of secondary payloads, including four satellites from Moscow State University, MGU, from Vostochny. (As of April 2021. As of second half of 2020, the launch was expected between August and October 2021).


End of 2021: A Soyuz-2 rocket to launch a cluster of small payloads from Vostochny, including the second StriX-β radar imaging demonstration satellite. (As of March 2021)


 

Cancelled missions

2021: A Soyuz-5 methane-burning launch vehicle to fly its first test mission (As of mid-2014).


2021: Russia to launch the Ekspress-AT4 communications satellite (as of 2014).


2021: Russia to launch the Ekspress-AT5 communications satellite (as of 2014).


2021: Russia to launch the Ekspress-AMU8 communications satellite (as of 2014).


 

For missions in 2023 click here

 

insider content

 

 


This page is compiled by Anatoly Zak

Last update: January 22, 2022

All rights reserved

 

insider content

Rover

Scale model of the Mars rover for the ExoMars project. Copyright © 2010 Anatoly Zak


Lander

Scale model of the Mars lander with the ExoMars rover inside. Copyright © 2010 Anatoly Zak


Resurs-PM

Resurs-PM satellite as depicted in 2017. Credit: RKTs Progress


Euclid

At the end of 2015, the Euclid space observatory was promised to launch in December 2020. By the middle of 2020, the launch was promised in 2022. Credit: ESA